Halikko Church

Salo, Finland

The oldest record of church in Halikko is dated back to the year 1352. The wooden church was replaced probably approximately 1440. Original, two-aisle church was dedicated to St. Birgit. During the Reformation old chalk paintings were overpainted and church was left to dilapidate. Too small and dicky church was renovated and expanded in 1799 and again in 1813-1815. The old sacristy, weapons room and the tomb of famous noble family Horn were dismantled then. New tombs for Horns and another famous noble family Armfelt were added to the church.

According the legend, Henrik Olafsson the Graf of Åminne manor financed the construction of the Halikko Church, the Pertteli Church and the Chapel of Salo to pay the sins of his family. His father-in-law had murdered his wife and the seen a vision in which Jesus said that he must pay his sins.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Address

Vaskiontie, Salo, Finland
See all sites in Salo

Details

Founded: 1440
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Unto Rauhala (2 years ago)
Oli taas ilo käydä. Kiitos
Seppo Junnila (2 years ago)
Tunnelmallinen vanha pyhättö.
unicorn blood (2 years ago)
Ihan tavallinen .
MR Ruottu (2 years ago)
Paikka joka on rauhallinen ja turvallinen isän käden alla.
Juha Berglund (2 years ago)
Perhaps not as big as St. Peter's Basilica in Rome or as beautiful as Sagrada Família of Barcelona, but it is a pretty small medieval church in its own right. I got married there, and we're still happily married, so I'm inclined to give it five stars.
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