Swedish Artillery Museum

Kristianstad, Sweden

The Artillery Museum is located on the training area once used by the former Wendes Artillery Regiment. It houses the Army Museum collection of artillery pieces. All of the types of guns, howitzers, mortars and grenade launchers used by the Swedish army from the beginning of the 1700s are on display, together with artillery equipment such as gun carriages, harnesses, towing vehicles, radar and fire control equipment and ammunition.

The museum also works together with a military history display group that exercises with both horse-drawn and vehicle-towed artillery pieces wearing uniforms of the time. A museum annex is also planned for smaller parts of the collection in one of the old artillery barracks in the centre of Kristianstad. The museum will assume the overall responsibility for preserving the historical traditions of the Swedish Artillery.

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Oleksandr Bashyn (7 months ago)
Integrering and amazing place. Lots of fun for adults and kids. And there is a medieval castle inside ;)
Regina Garcia (10 months ago)
The gallery has family friendly exhibitions and a nice cafeteria.
Joseph Anthony Reyes (3 years ago)
Very fascinating exhibits and a lot of interactive features that will entertain and educate kids and adults. Super helpful and friendly staff. Highly recommended! Free admission when we visited ? Convenient location in the city near station, cafe located in the ground floor. Wonderful museum!
Keith White (3 years ago)
Good way to spend an hour or so finding out the history of Kristianstad. Some exhibits have English information as well as Swedish. Free entry
James Nicoll (4 years ago)
Went for the Christmas market, checked out the exhibits too, nice local museum. It's centrally located so I parked at the nearby shopping centre, always parking places there for 10 kronor per hour.(2019 price)
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