Swedish Artillery Museum

Kristianstad, Sweden

The Artillery Museum is located on the training area once used by the former Wendes Artillery Regiment. It houses the Army Museum collection of artillery pieces. All of the types of guns, howitzers, mortars and grenade launchers used by the Swedish army from the beginning of the 1700s are on display, together with artillery equipment such as gun carriages, harnesses, towing vehicles, radar and fire control equipment and ammunition.

The museum also works together with a military history display group that exercises with both horse-drawn and vehicle-towed artillery pieces wearing uniforms of the time. A museum annex is also planned for smaller parts of the collection in one of the old artillery barracks in the centre of Kristianstad. The museum will assume the overall responsibility for preserving the historical traditions of the Swedish Artillery.

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ezra de Wit (2 years ago)
Very nice museum
Sanchari De (2 years ago)
Not very impressive for adults.
Allen Holliday (2 years ago)
Brilliant little museum plenty of interactive items for everyone...makes a change to have all the exhibits working unlike the museums in the UK where you can't touch and very little works. Even without the modern tech you find in The Yorvik centre at York this one is well worth a visit.
naval steed (2 years ago)
Definitely worth visiting!
Chenna Kishore Reddy Chada (3 years ago)
Very nice and informational
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