Kerimäki Church

Kerimäki, Finland

The Kerimäki Church is the largest wooden church in the world. Designed by Anders Fredrik Granstedt and built between 1844 and 1847, the church has a length of 45 metres (148 ft), a width of 42 m (138 ft), a height of 37 m (121 ft) and a seating capacity of more than 3,000. Altogether there can be 5,000 people at a time in the church.

It has been rumoured that the size of the church was the result of a miscalculation when it was built (supposedly the architect was working in centimetres, which the builder took to be inches, which are 2.54 times larger). Further studies, however, have shown that the church was actually intended to be as big as it is, so it could easily accommodate a half of the area's population at the same time.

During wintertime, services are held in a smaller "winter church" (built in 1953), since the main building has no heating.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1844-1847
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simona Masova (2 years ago)
Unfortunately could not get inside, but really stunning building just from outside.
Karl S (3 years ago)
Outstanding church in eastern Finland. Very tall and you can go inside.
Dirgni “Ingrid” (3 years ago)
World biggest wooden church. A place to be in Finland. Very beautiful. We could drink a Coffee in the belttower in summerholidays
Mika Skarp (3 years ago)
Amazing place, huge wooden construction.
Ilpo Kettunen (3 years ago)
Really big church. They say it is the largest wooden church in the world. But fact check reveals a couple of taller church exist in Guyana and Russia. Although not very decorated, it is a place well worth visiting.
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