Savonlinna Cathedral

Savonlinna, Finland

The people of Savonlinna had to go to the Sääminki church when they didn't have their own church. In 1850 governor Aleksander Thesleff gave order to build a church in Savonniemi. The actual construction began in 1874 and was completed in 1878. The church was designed by architect Axel Hampus Dahlström in the Gothic Revival style and it has room for 1000 people.

In 1896 the new diocese of Savonlinna was founded and the Savonlinna church became a cathedral. The first bishop was Gustaf Johansson. In 1925 the bishop's seat was moved to Vyborg, but the church still retained "cathedral" as its name.

During the Winter War in 1 May 1940 Savonlinna was bombed and the church was damaged. It was restored in 1947–1948 by architect Bertel Liljeqvist. In 1990–1991 it was renovated by Ansu Ånström.

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Details

Founded: 1874-1878
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Teemu Tuiskuvaara (11 months ago)
Ulkoa vaikuttavan näköinen valaistuksessaan talvi pimeällä. Joulujumalanpalvelus liturgialtaan todella mielenkiintoinen.
Marju Immonen (11 months ago)
Rauhoittava paikka. Kaunis kirkko.
riitta miettinen (11 months ago)
Kokemisen arvoonen upea.kirkko !
Heidi Ansalammi (11 months ago)
Mukava peruskirkko. Konsertit ihania. Paikoitus todella huono.
Marko M (14 months ago)
Väärä päivä, vuorokaudenaika ja vuodenaika (jos on Tiekirkko), joten sisälle ei päässyt, mutta ulkoisesti arvioiden varsin hieno ja hyvä esimerkki goottilaistyylisestä kirkosta. Näyttää kirkolta, ei miltään kenkälaatikolta.
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