Pikkukirkko (Small Church) of Savonlinna was built by the Orthodox parish in 1846 according the design by L. T. J. Visconti. The Lutheran parish bought it in 1938 and used it as the main church until 1950s. Today it is a popular wedding and christening church.

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Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

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User Reviews

Mauri Pesonen (2 years ago)
Ei ole palanut,eikä purettu. Säästynyt Savonlinnan vanhoja rakennuksia vaivaamalta taudilta.
Marko M (2 years ago)
Hieno kirkko, vaikka ei olekaan kovin suuri.
Vesa-Heikki Kinanen (2 years ago)
Hieno kirkko
Svetlana Vorobyeva (3 years ago)
Церковь Св. Елизаветы и пр. Захария, построена в середине 19 в. Архитектор Висконти. Строилась как православная церкорвь, в 40 годы 20 века перешла в собственность лютеранского прихода, в 2014 году вновь выкуплена православной общиной. Местные жители ласково зовут ее Pikkukirkko (Маленькая церковь), большая часть нынешних жителей города венчались именно здесь.
Val Tar (4 years ago)
Изначально была построена как православная и была освящена в честь святого пророка Захарии и праведной Елизаветы. В 1938 году была выкуплена лютеранским приходом
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