Fredensborg Palace

Fredensborg, Denmark

Fredensborg Palace was built as a hunting seat for King Frederik IV by the architect J.C. Krieger. Construction began in 1719. The main building was first used in 1722 and the chapel in 1726. It was rebuilt and expanded during the reigns of King Christian VI and of King Frederik V and his Queen, Juliane Marie, by the architects N.Eigtved, L. de Thurah and C.F. Harsdorff.

After Queen Juliane Marie’s death in 1796, the palace was rarely used. It was not until the reign of King Christian IX and Queen Louise that the palace again became the setting for the Royal Family’s life for lengthy periods. “Europe’s parents-in-law” gathered their daughters and sons-in-law, all of whom represented many of Europe’s royal and princely houses, at Fredensborg Palace every summer. Now the Royal Couple use the palace for three months in the spring and three in the autumn. Fredensborg Palace is often the setting for important events in the life of the Royal Family.

The palace gardens cover just under 300 acres and were originally designed by J.C. Krieger. It was reorganised by N. Jardin in the 1760s and has since been adapted frequently to the changing tastes of the times. Today, the main features of the original garden have been recreated. Most of the sculptures in the garden are by the great Nordic neo-classical sculptor, J. Wiedewelt. In the “Valley of the Norsemen”, there are 68 sandstone figures of Norwegian and Faroese farmers and fishermen. These figures were originally carved by the sculptor J.G. Grund. They were re-carved at the end of the 1900s from original casts.

In 1995, an orangery was built adjacent to the Palace kitchen garden. It serves as storage for tender plants in the winter, and flowers are grown here to decorate the various palaces.Fredensborg Palace and church are open to the public through guided tours. There is an admission fee. Fredensborg’s vegetable garden and orangery are open to the public through paid admission to Fredensborg. The palace garden, including the Valley of the Norsemen, is open to the public without an admission fee year-round, 24 hours a day.

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Details

Founded: 1719
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adarsh naik (2 years ago)
Must visit place ! Had some real fun with my friend here
Kas Radogad (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle and park belonging to the royal family. It's always lovely to make a walk there!
J EB (3 years ago)
Its beautiful in the dark too! Sadly the Queen was not in. Perhaps she was mingling with her subjects in a nearby castle...
Christian Larsen (3 years ago)
The Queen lives here! The park is really nice and the walk along the lake is beautiful, in all seasons! I especially enjoy the colours of the trees in the fall. The palace garden is definitely worth a visit. The royal guard is on duty here, and you can see them patrolling the palace.
Perri Brereton (3 years ago)
Queen Margaret of Denmark's Summer Palace is the highlight & if you are there prior to midday you wil see the Changing of her Guard ... well worth the pretty drive. Delightful village .. fabulous bakery
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