Fredensborg Palace

Fredensborg, Denmark

Fredensborg Palace was built as a hunting seat for King Frederik IV by the architect J.C. Krieger. Construction began in 1719. The main building was first used in 1722 and the chapel in 1726. It was rebuilt and expanded during the reigns of King Christian VI and of King Frederik V and his Queen, Juliane Marie, by the architects N.Eigtved, L. de Thurah and C.F. Harsdorff.

After Queen Juliane Marie’s death in 1796, the palace was rarely used. It was not until the reign of King Christian IX and Queen Louise that the palace again became the setting for the Royal Family’s life for lengthy periods. “Europe’s parents-in-law” gathered their daughters and sons-in-law, all of whom represented many of Europe’s royal and princely houses, at Fredensborg Palace every summer. Now the Royal Couple use the palace for three months in the spring and three in the autumn. Fredensborg Palace is often the setting for important events in the life of the Royal Family.

The palace gardens cover just under 300 acres and were originally designed by J.C. Krieger. It was reorganised by N. Jardin in the 1760s and has since been adapted frequently to the changing tastes of the times. Today, the main features of the original garden have been recreated. Most of the sculptures in the garden are by the great Nordic neo-classical sculptor, J. Wiedewelt. In the “Valley of the Norsemen”, there are 68 sandstone figures of Norwegian and Faroese farmers and fishermen. These figures were originally carved by the sculptor J.G. Grund. They were re-carved at the end of the 1900s from original casts.

In 1995, an orangery was built adjacent to the Palace kitchen garden. It serves as storage for tender plants in the winter, and flowers are grown here to decorate the various palaces.Fredensborg Palace and church are open to the public through guided tours. There is an admission fee. Fredensborg’s vegetable garden and orangery are open to the public through paid admission to Fredensborg. The palace garden, including the Valley of the Norsemen, is open to the public without an admission fee year-round, 24 hours a day.

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Details

Founded: 1719
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mikkel Larsen (3 months ago)
Unfortunately we could not get very close and had to just enjoy the castle from the garden. We rolled out a little blanket and sat there for maybe half an hour with some light snacks. The Castle looks really nice as the sun starts to set.
Nezam. Azizaddini (4 months ago)
Quite different environment and atmosphere comparing to ordinary/public areas for walking... with fascinating, charming and calming views. There is still room to make the pools and basins around the castle cleaner and mire beautiful. Public access only in limited time of the year (e.g. July)
Adrianna Gregersen (8 months ago)
Fredensborg Palace is the Danish Royal Family’s spring and autumn residence, and is often the site of important state visits and events in the Royal Family. It is surrounded by the palace gardens which are among Denmark's largest historical gardens, and are Denmark's finest example of a baroque garden. Beautiful spot for an afternoon walk
Peter Engkjær (11 months ago)
A beautiful palace with beautiful garden/forest around it. Well worth a walk.
Himanshu Sathe (16 months ago)
Such a wonderful palace and the stunningly beautiful gardens of the Danish royalty. If you can go inside don’t miss the tour open only in July and early Aug. The palace is seeped in history. Best time to go is July.
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