Christiansborg Palace

Copenhagen, Denmark

Christiansborg Palace is the seat of the Danish Parliament, the Danish Prime Minister's Office and the Danish Supreme Court. Also, several parts of the palace are used by the monarchy, including the Royal Reception Rooms, the Palace Chapel and the Royal Stables.

The palace is thus the house of Denmark's three supreme powers: the executive power, the legislative power, and the judicial power. It is the only building in the world that houses all three of a country's branches of government. Christiansborg Palace is owned by the Danish state, and is run by the Palaces and Properties Agency.

The present building, the third to be built on the site, is the last in a series of successive castles and palaces constructed on the same site since the erection of the first castle in 1167. The first castle on the site was Absalon's Castle. According to the Danish chronicler Saxo Grammaticus, Bishop Absalon of Roskilde built a castle in 1167 on a small island outside Copenhagen Harbour. Since the early fifteenth century, the various buildings have served as the base of the central administration; until 1794 as the principal residence of the Danish kings and after 1849 as the seat of parliament.

The palace today bears witness to three eras of Danish architecture, as the result of two serious fires. The first fire occurred in 1794 and the second in 1884. The main part of the current palace, finished in 1928, is in the historicist Neo-baroque style. The chapel dates to 1826 and is in a neoclassical style. The showgrounds were built 1738-46, in a baroque style.

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Details

Founded: 1733
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claudia Chiţu (3 months ago)
This is the greatest palace I have seen. The rohal rooms are spectacular and impressive by the style and size. It is free to take pictures and there is an app Useeum that helps with an audio guide. The royal kitchen is small and simple but interesting. Another point of interest is the ruins from the first castle which is well presented. The royal stables is a small place and all horses are white and is more enjoyable to see them outside on a morning ride rather than at the opening time when is lunch time for them.
Joe Hyde (5 months ago)
This is a great excursion as you have the main palace as it stands today which is extremely luxurious and well presented with information throughout. Then you also have the basement museum which showcases the original foundations of a much earlier palace which was destroyed. It also showcases the many iterations of the palace between the original and the current which still stands today. Great visit and included in Copenhagen card.
Varun R (5 months ago)
My visit was during 2018. Even though I didn't go inside the palace, the surrounding areas are nice to roam around. Good place to get a glimpse of street life and local scene of Copenhagen. Can be nicer during spring or summer. Enjoy your tour!
Georgios T (5 months ago)
Majestic palace with lots of history behind it. If you are interested in the historical aspect don't miss the ruins part. Otherwise just the Reception Rooms are enough for an experience worthy of the slightly steep price. Access to the tower and chapel is free.
Sajid Decosta (6 months ago)
Beautiful place and they give free entrance to top of the building. Yes with elevator. Perfect place to see city from some heights. Just be ready to stand in a long queue. It’s worth. Go early in morning and you will get less people in queue. They also have good restaurant on top. Actually that is the reason they give free access to top with elevator. It is most recommended place to visit if you want to see Copenhagen from some height.
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