Trinitatis Church

Copenhagen, Denmark

Trinitatis Church is part of the 17th century Trinitatis Complex, which includes the Rundetårn astronomical observatory tower and the Copenhagen University Library, in addition to the church. Built in the time of Christian IV, the church initially served the students of Copenhagen University.

The interior was seriously damaged in the fire of 1728 but was rebuilt in 1731. The bases and capitals of the columns and arches were repaired. All wood furnishings were replaced, and the floor was covered with tiles from Öland. The reconstruction was in Northern Gothic-Baroque style. The church was rededicated October 7, 1731 and the remains of the university library were moved again. The furnishings were renewed with an altarpiece and pulpit by Friederich Ehbisch (1731) and a large Baroque clock (1757). The church was refurbished in 1763.

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Details

Founded: 1637
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lars Pach (2 years ago)
Beautiful 1700 style church in the heart of Copenhagen. A great place for reflection and peace. Free admission
Martin Brandt (2 years ago)
Beautiful interior. Be sure to climb to the 1st floor for the view. Also visit The Round Tower next door.
Paul Sinding (2 years ago)
Best church in Copenhagen #DomkirkeNu
Trevor Potts (2 years ago)
Attended an absolutely fantastic korkoncert here. The choral melodies drifted sweetly through the church, as we sat and looked up to the Luminous Ivory ceiling lined with threads of gold. Utterly beautiful.
Satu Soppela-Hyle (2 years ago)
Quite magnificent place! Such gorgeous architecture and organs! We we're enjoying a classical concert with a soprano and a bariton, and voices sounded extremely well.
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