The Rundetårn (Round Tower) is a 17th-century tower located in central Copenhagen. One of the many architectural projects of Christian IV, it was built as an astronomical observatory. It is most noted for its 7.5-turn helical corridor leading to the top, and for the expansive views it affords over Copenhagen.

The tower is part of the Trinitatis Complex which also provided the scholars of the time with a university chapel, the Trinitatis Church, and an academic library which was the first purpose-built facilities of the Copenhagen University Library which had been founded in 1482.

Today the Round Tower serves as an observation tower for expansive views of Copenhagen, a public astronomical observatory and a historical monument. In the same time the Library Hall, located above the church and only accessible along the tower's ramp, is an active cultural venue with both exhibitions and a busy concert schedule.

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Founded: 1637
Category:
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chris Smith (12 months ago)
It's a round tower! This is a solid tourist stop if you're in Copenhagen. There's not a lot of world history stuff to see here but this is one of the better National history sites to visit. Wear your hiking boots or best walking shoes and get read for some exercise. The view is great when you get to the top and since I'm completely addicted to the Danish hot dogs, I will point out that you can pretty much smell all of the hot dogs from the top of this place...
Kaz Man (12 months ago)
Be prepared to walk! We took a stroller up and wasn't too bad but at the very top there is a extremely narrow spiral staircase that two people can barely pass on. There are interesting rooms on the way up for you to visit and a good sized rest room. You pay to get in.
Ken Pennington (12 months ago)
Interesting walk up a spiral ramp with some narrow stairs at top, but once reached had some good views over Copenhagen. It was very busy the time I went which detracted from the experience, but I shouldn't be selfish. All around well worth the entry and a good experience.
Danae Moodley (2 years ago)
This historic tower is stunning. It’s so simple yet something about it makes it my favourite attraction yet! Make sure to go into all the rooms and make your way to the top to see the massive telescope and gorgeous view.
Hind Sabanekh (2 years ago)
I can't believe we were about to leave this out from our itinerary. It's beautiful. The views from the windows is breathtaking, the architecture is magnificent. Go there when the the sun is out so you enjoy the view and the experience. We loved it.
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