Copenhagen City Hall is the headquarters of the municipal council as well as the Lord mayor of the Copenhagen Municipality. The current building was inaugurated in 1905. It was designed by the architect Martin Nyrop in the National Romantic style but with inspiration from the Siena City Hall. It is dominated by its richly ornamented front, the gilded statue of Absalon just above the balcony and the tall, slim clock tower. The latter is at 105.6 metres one of the tallest buildings in the generally low city of Copenhagen.

Before the city hall moved to its present location, it was situated at Gammeltorv/Nytorv. The first city hall was in use from about 1479 until it burned down in the great Copenhagen fire of 1728. The second city hall was built in 1728 and was designed by J.C. Ernst and J.C. Krieger. It burned down in the Copenhagen fire of 1795. It was not until 1815 that a new city hall, designed by C.F.Hansen, was erected on Nytorv. It was intended to house both the city hall and a court. Today it is still in use as the city court of Copenhagen.

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Founded: 1893-1905
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark

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Susy Paula (12 months ago)
City Hall in Copenhagen was opened in 1905 and the architecture was inspired by the city hall in Siena, Italy. It is one of the tallest buildings in Copenhagen. The City Hall also houses Jen Olsen's World Clock, an advanced astronomical clock.
Joyce Tang (2 years ago)
Copenhagen's City Hall almost looks a bit like a castle on the outside! The city hall is free to visit. Upon entering, you'll have a chance to take a look at Jens Olsen's World Clock! Inside, the City Hall is lovely and you're able to walk through some parts of the City Hall's upper levels if you wish.
Richard Carter (2 years ago)
I thought this was a spectacular building overlooking the harbour. Wonderful architecture on the outside. Free entry. It has a majestic centre hall. Beautiful. At the end of the hall are large windows with grand views of the harbour. I took lots of pictures. Toilets are in the basement. From here a short walk to the National Art Gallery. Also, the trendy Aker Brygge area & harbour, with it's fantastic restaurants, is a short walk away.
Gert Pedersen (2 years ago)
Just do IT,, you will love it - I have been in this place over the years more times. And like this place, it is a part of a good story about Copenhagen and it is a must to see it. If you like old buildings, old story's and new, then go here and you will love it. Btw it is good on a Danish raining day ;-)
Tommy Chen (2 years ago)
Free to visit the hall, it’s stunning. The main hall has exhibitions from time to time. There’s a small fee to be escorted to the top of the tower. They do it in groups and the last round is at 2 pm. Being one of the tallest structures in Copenhagen, the tower provides spectacular views of city.
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