St. Nicholas' Church

Køge, Denmark

The church of St. Nicholas was originally built after the establishment of Køge town, but there are only few remains of this church. The nave and tower of the current church were constructed between 1250-1300. It was enlarged and the tower raised higher during next centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1250-1300
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Henrik Skourup (4 months ago)
Beautiful but not the nicest we have seen
Anette H. Hallev (2 years ago)
Et anderledes view i Køge Kirke, alias Sct. Nikolai Kirke. Kirken er som andre kirker bygget i flere tempi. Den ældste del af kirketårnet er fra ca 1324. Om sommeren er det muligt at besøge kirketårnet og f.eks opleve hvælvingene og på samme tid forestille sig det enorme og smukke kirkerum, som befinder sig lige under én. Der er en storslået udsigt fra kirketårnet over Køge. God fornøjelse!
Robert Bartmann (2 years ago)
Nice church with a friendly guide.
Robert Bartmann (2 years ago)
Nice church with a friendly guide.
Cameron Wesley Lee (Cam Lee Therapy) (3 years ago)
Just saw the outside, but interesting structure and meaningful in an historical context.
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