St. Nicholas' Church

Køge, Denmark

The church of St. Nicholas was originally built after the establishment of Køge town, but there are only few remains of this church. The nave and tower of the current church were constructed between 1250-1300. It was enlarged and the tower raised higher during next centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1250-1300
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marianne Hansen (6 months ago)
Smuk kirke som bør opleves
Marianne Hansen (7 months ago)
Skøn skøn kirke som skal opleves.
Niels Hemmingsen (7 months ago)
En rigtig god del af Danmark
Jan Sognnes Rasmussen (9 months ago)
En smuk kirke, som er bygget omkring 1250-1300. Den ligger i centrum af Køge og er byens vartegn. Tårnet blev opført i år 1324 i 4 stokværk og i 1400-tallet kom et femte stokværk til. Med sine 43 meter har tårnet været anvendt både som fæstningsværk og fyrtårn for søfarende. Kirken er ombygget flere gange og i dag er tårnet kirkens ældst bevarede bygningsdel
Anastacia (16 months ago)
Beautiful old church with excellent location
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