Skovgaard Museum

Viborg, Denmark

The Skovgaard Museum is situated in the former town hall from 1728 next to Viborg Cathedral. It holds a collection of works by four generations of the Skovgaard family of artists.

The main feature of the permanent collection is the work of the Skovgaard family. Peter Christian Skovgaard (1817–1875) was the principal representative of national romanticlandscapes of the Golden Age of Danish painting. His sons, Joakim Skovgaard (1856–1933), who created the mural decorations in Viborg Cathedral, and Niels Skovgaard (1858–1938) also worked with landscape painting. However, their work is characterized rather by Symbolism and burgeoning Modernism. The collection holds exquisite examples of landscape painting as well as religious and mythological subjects.

The circle of artists surrounding the Skovgaard family is also represented in the museum's collections, with works by, among others, the renowned Danish artists Niels Larsen Stevns,Viggo Petersen and Thorvald Bindesbøll. The Skovgaard Museum shows three to four temporary exhibitions a year, ranging from art from the beginning of the nineteenth century to contemporary art. The permanent collection is on display all year round.

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Category: Museums in Denmark

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kevin Donovan (2 years ago)
A really nice boutique museum centered around a fine collection from multiple artists in the Skovgaard family. Traveling exhibitions and interactive installations are always interesting.
Steve Miller (2 years ago)
Nature paintings are superb ..
Zella Kadouzian (2 years ago)
Interesting
Lars Hansen (3 years ago)
Dejlig museum, med nogle fantastiske billeder, fra Danmarks guldalder, til 1930erne.
Britta Christensen (3 years ago)
Spændende udstilling om maleren N.K. Skovgaard. Gratis adgang.
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