Hald Castle Ruin

Viborg, Denmark

Hald Castle was built in 1528 by the bishop Jørgen Friis, who was the last Roman Catholic bishop of Viborg. It is said that Friis was one of the first prisons in Hald tower after the Reformation. The castle was left to decay and in the 1700s it was abandoned. Anyway in late 1800s the owned Christopher Krabbe reconstructed the tower which is today the most visible part of the former castle. Today castle ruins are open to the public for free.

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Address

Vejlevej 44, Viborg, Denmark
See all sites in Viborg

Details

Founded: 1528
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

More Information

thyrashm.blogspot.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marc Berry (8 months ago)
Heavily under reconstruction at the moment, no body actually working on it right now though. It's a lovely walk down to it grin the car park. And you can duck through the tunnels all around foot different views
Maryline Kemel (2 years ago)
They where working, doing some new excavations. The men working there gave us some information told us we could go and check everything out regardless of the digging going on. Nice sight. Will come back another year to see the progress
Phil Parker (2 years ago)
Work in progress but well worth a visit
Mantas Vasiliauskas (2 years ago)
Nice
Douglas Ketchum (2 years ago)
Oh wonderful 15th century stronghold with impressive historical meaning and significance.
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