Hald Castle Ruin

Viborg, Denmark

Hald Castle was built in 1528 by the bishop Jørgen Friis, who was the last Roman Catholic bishop of Viborg. It is said that Friis was one of the first prisons in Hald tower after the Reformation. The castle was left to decay and in the 1700s it was abandoned. Anyway in late 1800s the owned Christopher Krabbe reconstructed the tower which is today the most visible part of the former castle. Today castle ruins are open to the public for free.

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Address

Vejlevej 44, Viborg, Denmark
See all sites in Viborg

Details

Founded: 1528
Category: Ruins in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

More Information

thyrashm.blogspot.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Skov Sørensen (2 years ago)
Very interesting historical ruins. Definitely worth a visit.
Hans L D H (2 years ago)
Et hyggeligt og fredeligt sted. Det får den 5. stjerne når restaureringsprojektet er færdigt, og udsigten bliver endnu bedre. Husk at have en lygte med, så du kan se ind i de hvælvede rum i tårnet og voldgraven.
Viking507 (2 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful place! A simple review doesn't do it justice. You can visit with family, friends, or even alone and enjoy yourself. Still planning to take a day to go ALL around the lake, and not just the ruin. Must be amazing to grill with friends and family in some of the nearby areas, in seasons when allowed. My experience was playing chess with a friend on top of the ancient tower, truly a calming historical / nature experience
Lukas (3 years ago)
Really nice place to visit with family or friends. Wild nature, lake with clear water, few old buildings. Interesting.
Sven Andresen (5 years ago)
A good place to go with your family
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