Hald Castle Ruin

Viborg, Denmark

Hald Castle was built in 1528 by the bishop Jørgen Friis, who was the last Roman Catholic bishop of Viborg. It is said that Friis was one of the first prisons in Hald tower after the Reformation. The castle was left to decay and in the 1700s it was abandoned. Anyway in late 1800s the owned Christopher Krabbe reconstructed the tower which is today the most visible part of the former castle. Today castle ruins are open to the public for free.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Vejlevej 44, Viborg, Denmark
See all sites in Viborg

Details

Founded: 1528
Category: Ruins in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

More Information

thyrashm.blogspot.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marc Berry (27 days ago)
Heavily under reconstruction at the moment, no body actually working on it right now though. It's a lovely walk down to it grin the car park. And you can duck through the tunnels all around foot different views
Maryline Kemel (11 months ago)
They where working, doing some new excavations. The men working there gave us some information told us we could go and check everything out regardless of the digging going on. Nice sight. Will come back another year to see the progress
Phil Parker (11 months ago)
Work in progress but well worth a visit
Mantas Vasiliauskas (12 months ago)
Nice
Douglas Ketchum (15 months ago)
Oh wonderful 15th century stronghold with impressive historical meaning and significance.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.