The first known reference to Hald is from 1328 when it was owned by Rigsmarsk Ludvig Albertsen Eberstein. Then known as Brattingsborg, was located to the east of the current main building. Niels Bugge acquired Hald in 1346 and built a new main building where he took up residence. He was active in the uprising against King Valdemar IV and was later killed on the way back from failed peace negotiations at Slagelse. Bugge's son-in-law Skarpenberg took over Hald but soon had to sell it to Queen Margaret I who later gave the estate to the Bishop Seat in Viborg in 1383.

The third Hald was built in 1528 for Jørgen Friis, Bishop of Viborg, on a small peninsula reaching into the lake. Ruins surrounded by tall earthworks can still be seen at the site, although the remains of a tower in masonry are partly a reconstruction. The fourth Hald was completed in 1703 for General Gregers Daa. It was a four-winged half-timbered building located a little south of the current building, in the current park, but nothing remains of it today. The Fifth Hald, was built in 1798 for Ove Høegh-Guldberg, who had served as Prime Minister from 1772 to 1784. Hald Manor is a single storey building with a 3-storey central section, originally built as a gatehouse in 1798. The two pavilions in the park were probably built in 1795.

The Danish Centre for Writers and Translators was founded in 2002. It offers writers, translators and illustrators free stays where they can work in a peaceful environment. The centre also hosts and arranges various public literary events. A barn from the mid-18th century was renovated in 2008 and is now home to an exhibition about the area's geography, nature and history.

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User Reviews

Michael Møller (2 months ago)
Ikke noget videre og komme efter Mangler virkelig info om hvordan man kommer fremvtil ruinen
Per Due (2 months ago)
Beautiful nature surroundings a visit please
Adi Kurniawan (17 months ago)
Did not enter but just roamed outside. Some renovation works going on.
Victoria Caceres (2 years ago)
Amazing manor and writers'residence
Kristine Bjerno (2 years ago)
Smuk have med rester af en barokhave (smukt symmetrisk og i terrasser) og en romantisk have (buske og snoede stier) lige ned til en smuk sø :-)
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