The first known reference to Hald is from 1328 when it was owned by Rigsmarsk Ludvig Albertsen Eberstein. Then known as Brattingsborg, was located to the east of the current main building. Niels Bugge acquired Hald in 1346 and built a new main building where he took up residence. He was active in the uprising against King Valdemar IV and was later killed on the way back from failed peace negotiations at Slagelse. Bugge's son-in-law Skarpenberg took over Hald but soon had to sell it to Queen Margaret I who later gave the estate to the Bishop Seat in Viborg in 1383.

The third Hald was built in 1528 for Jørgen Friis, Bishop of Viborg, on a small peninsula reaching into the lake. Ruins surrounded by tall earthworks can still be seen at the site, although the remains of a tower in masonry are partly a reconstruction. The fourth Hald was completed in 1703 for General Gregers Daa. It was a four-winged half-timbered building located a little south of the current building, in the current park, but nothing remains of it today. The Fifth Hald, was built in 1798 for Ove Høegh-Guldberg, who had served as Prime Minister from 1772 to 1784. Hald Manor is a single storey building with a 3-storey central section, originally built as a gatehouse in 1798. The two pavilions in the park were probably built in 1795.

The Danish Centre for Writers and Translators was founded in 2002. It offers writers, translators and illustrators free stays where they can work in a peaceful environment. The centre also hosts and arranges various public literary events. A barn from the mid-18th century was renovated in 2008 and is now home to an exhibition about the area's geography, nature and history.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Victoria Caceres (2 years ago)
Amazing manor and writers'residence
Kristine Bjerno (2 years ago)
Smuk have med rester af en barokhave (smukt symmetrisk og i terrasser) og en romantisk have (buske og snoede stier) lige ned til en smuk sø :-)
Mette Krebs (2 years ago)
Beautiful historic location
Hans L D H (2 years ago)
Dejligt historisk sted, hvor man kan holde udflugt, tænde et bål, gå en tur eller besøge museet i den stråtækte lade ved naturskolen. I den kommende tid ('18 - '19) bliver landskabet ført tilbage til Daas Hald, hvilket jeg ser frem til.
Pia Jachobsen (3 years ago)
Beautiful areal, ok sleeping facilities, fine kitchen and bathing facilities
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.