Øm Abbey Ruins

Ry, Denmark

According to the abbey chronicle, Øm Abbey was founded in 1172 by Cistercian monks from Vitskøl Abbey in northern Jutland. The abbey was dedicated to the Virgin Mary and was called 'Cara Insula' or the 'dear Island'. The Øm Abbey Chronicle was written by local monks from 1206 to 1267 when it abruptly ends. It outlines events at the abbey during the tumultuous years of the early 13th century.

Bishop Svend of Aarhus transferred many of his own holdings to Øm Abbey and then retired there to live out his days among the monks. He was buried in front of the high altar. Abbot Michael, the twelfth abbot, was buried in the chapter room in the unfinished church. Bishop Peder Elafssen of Aarhus was buried in the church in 1246, years before it was completed. Abbot Jens (1246–1249) was wounded while trying to prevent bandits from stealing horses from the abbey.

The second abbey church was completed in 1257 built of red bricks, the most common building material of the day in the region. It was built in late Gothic style, with a nave nad a transept, but had an irregular shape.

One event which caused trouble for Øm Abbey was the suspicion that the monks harbored Abbot Arnfast of Ryd Abbey who was accused of having murdered King Christopher I of Denmark by giving him poisoned communion wine during mass at Ribe Cathedral in 1259. Abbot Arnfast was supposed to have poisoned the king for his persecution of ArchbishopJacob Erlendsen. A thorough search failed to produce Arnfast, who had fled the country, but any regard that Christopher's son, King Eric V, had had for the Cistercians vanished.

At its height in the late 15th century, the abbey consisted of the church, hospital and hospital cemetery, library, chapter house, refectory, dormitory, cloister and cloister garden, and a guest house. The abbey measured approximately 120 meters by 80 meters. It was one of Denmark's richest houses with land holdings, mills, and a well-recognized hospital. Cistercians were excellent farmers and over time the abbey came into possession of many properties which brought additional income and prestige.

One of the important improvement the monks made to the site was to build three canals. Brother Martin discovered that Moss Lake was about a cubit higher than Lake Guden. The monks used that difference to build two canals near the abbey, one to bring fresh water to the abbey and a second to serve as a primitive sewerage system. The third canal built farther away from the abbey connected the two lakes and was used to transport goods through the lake region. The abbey prospered especially during and after the reign of Queen Margaret I of Denmark. By 1510 the abbey owned 250 properties all over central Jutland.

The Reformation in Denmark brought about the end of the abbey. When Denmark became officially Lutheran in 1536, the abbey was allowed to continue operating with the monks already there, but no new monks were to be admitted. In 1560 the last monk was moved to Sorø Abbey on Zealand, and the land and buildings became crown property underFrederik II. Just a year later, in 1561, Frederik II ordered the buildings to be demolished, and the stone, timber, and bricks used to extend Skanderborg Castle. The land on which the abbey had been located was divided into four large estates in 1571.

The town of Emborg grew on the site of the abbey and now surrounds the it, which has become part of the National Historic Museum system of Denmark.

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Address

Munkevej 6, Ry, Denmark
See all sites in Ry

Details

Founded: 1172
Category: Ruins in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Frank Lykke (2 years ago)
Et spændende indblik i en forlængst svundet tid som er et besøg værd
Wilco Vergeldt (2 years ago)
For me as someone who is very curious about the history of the smaller unknown places this speck on the the map we found only as a ruin symbol on out travel map. This was a great surprise. They have had extensive excavations over the years. And many things they found have been preserved in a small museum building on site also the first hand evidence of runes still being used so late in the middle ages is an interesting thing to be able to witness. And the old herb garden (with some herbs that were actually the plants thet they found growing in the wild after so many hundred years!) Is a very cool fact. Overall the area is beautiful to visit and hike in anyway dont forget to visit the museum when you're here.
Raymond Kolbæk (2 years ago)
Da jeg ingen særlige forventninger havde blev jeg meget positiv overrasket. Historisk sted med gode imfotavler ude i ruinerne og spændende udstilling i bygningerne. Kan absolut anbefales.
Daniel Hulgaard (3 years ago)
A ruin of a monetary. Only parts of the foundations remain. Skeletons and medical herbs on display. The guided tour is good but not all ways available.
Jesper Dalberg (3 years ago)
Museum that's really a ruin of an old convent
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