Skanderborg Castle Church

Skanderborg, Denmark

The Skanderborg chapel is the only remaining part of the former Skanderborg castle which was definitively demolished in 1770. In 1562-63 King Frederick II rebuilt the medieval castle on Slotsholmen (an elevation in the ground that used to be a small island) to a modern fortress. Because of the financial difficulties of the Kingdom of Denmark the king chose to take up residence in Skanderborg.

Hence in 1572 a chapel was constructed in the newly established royal wing which at the same time was increased with two storeys. The castle functioned as a residence for the royal family for several years and among other things it could be mentioned that Christian IV learned seamanship as well as horsemanship in Skanderborg.

The present church consists of a long nave with a round tower with a conical, copper spire. The tower was originally one of the castle’s corner towers.Below the church in the castle’s old wine cellar a crypt has been established with four glass mosaics by the sculptor V. Foersom Hegndal. A variety of the original furniture in noble renaissance can still be seen in the church. The baptismal font from 1850 has been made after a drawing by Bindesbøll.

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Details

Founded: 1572
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitdenmark.fr

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefan Winther (18 days ago)
Great castle church. The cemetery is also just so beautiful and beautiful right down to the lake.
Allan Röhl (3 months ago)
Lovely area for a walk
Bernadettes Eden (4 months ago)
Very beautiful church and location. The service was relevant and enriching.
Brian Strandbygaard Laursen (Brislau) (6 months ago)
Beautiful place. Good story. Polite staff in the church who let me in even though they had closed and were preparing for a wedding ??
Lene Nygaard (10 months ago)
Nice old church, but it is not so good space and not the best place for people with walking difficulties
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