Château de Bricquebec

Bricquebec, France

According the tradition the first castle in Bricquebec was built by Anslec with Scandinavian origin, who was related to the Duke of Normandy, William Longsword. Later Bricquebec Castle was owned by Robert I Bertran, who accompanied William the Conqueror in the conquest of England in 1066. His son, Robert II Bertran, is believed to have taken part in the taking of Jerusalem during the First Crusade in 1096. After the annexation of Normandy by the King of France, Philippe II Auguste, in 1204, the Bertrans did homage to him, for fifteen noble fiefs held from their barony of Bricquebec.

Myth has it that in 1270 the Knights Templar, who already had numerous other possessions in the area, founded a commandery in the castle, based on the architectural layout of the castle. The 13th century, 22 meters high, 11-sided keep stands on a 17 meters high motte and its outer walls resemble the octagonal geometry which was characteristic of the Order.

After the death of the last of the Bertrans, Bricquebec Castle went to the Paisnel family through marriage. During the 14th century the plague and famines ravaged the Cotentin peninsula and it was also the scene of multiple skirmishes between French, English and Navarrian troops. In 1418 the castle was occupied by the troops of King Henry V of England. Given to William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, then sold by him to captain Bertin Entwistle, the castle stayed under English rule until 1450. In 1452 Louis d'Estouteville took possession of the castle.

In the 16th century the barons of Bricquebec abandoned the castle in favor of their newer manors. In 1857 the castle was visited by Queen Victoria of England and in 1957 by Field Marshall Montgoméry.

At present there is a hotel inside the castle which has its website at Hostellerie du Château Bricquebec. The keep, amongst other parts of the castle, can be visited during summer months.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.castles.nl

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Darren Ford (2 years ago)
Good location for exploring the area
Els Venneman (2 years ago)
Mooi gebouw doch matig verzorgd.tapijten in de gangen liggen hobbelig.een terras op de verdieping zou een plaatje kunnen zijn, maar is dat helaas niet. Personeel,zelfs de receptie, spreekt geen woord Engels. De voordeur was om 22.30 op slot toen we thuiskwamen van een.etentje.Er bleek een code voor te zijn, dat had niemand verteld.... De keuken van t kasteel was op vrijdagavond gesloten.n b. Vandaar ergens anders gegeten. Ontbijt had wat uitgebreider mogen zijn.
Christophe Saint (2 years ago)
Great service. A a so nice surprise...
Gareth Watts (3 years ago)
Lovely place to stop over after a late channel crossing. Off the main routes and a proper experience of France, just off the ferry. Will visit again.
AnUnknown (4 years ago)
Very nice and enjoyable to look round. If you visit on a Monday the market is also on.
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