Château-sur-Epte Ruins

Château-sur-Epte, France

The Château-sur-Epte Castle construction was begun in 1097 by William Rufus, King of England, to reinforce the frontier of Epte. The castle occupied a site on the border between the Duchy of Normandy and the Kingdom of France. In 1119, it was besieged by Louis VI of France and reinforced by the Plantagenets in the 12th century and again during the Hundred Years' War.

In the 12th century, it was restored and reinforced by Henry II of England (keep and entry). Other works were carried out in the 14th century. In 1437, the château was captured by John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury. The castle's role declined in the 16th century and it was ordered to be dismantled by Mazarin in 1647. Transformed into an agricultural centre under the Ancien Régime, it comprised a motte with a stone keep, a lower court linked to the motte and defended by a curtain wall flanked in the east and west by two fortified gateways (14th century), a drawbridge and, in the lower court, a medieval barn, a 17th century corps de logis and a dovecote. The condition of the site deteriorated.

The ruins are private property. It has been listed since 1926 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

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Details

Founded: 1097
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gautier NICOLAS (13 months ago)
This magnificent castle dominates its village
reynald royer (14 months ago)
No one can not visit it is useless to remain marked in the visits to be made
Isab Huss (15 months ago)
The ruins of this castle are just impressive. With a little imagination it becomes the backdrop for Walter Scott's tales or the theme of a poem by Château Briand.
JaïpineX (17 months ago)
Castle discovered by the greatest chance while wandering in the region. It is certainly a ruin but it has a lot of charm. A great respect for all the volunteers who devote themselves to its restoration.
Sarunas Vil (2 years ago)
Great piece of history. I can just imagine what was happening behind these walls centuries ago. Fast forward to today, it is a bit run down, the walls are falling apart and of not taken care of this will be gone after another 50 years.
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