Château-sur-Epte Ruins

Château-sur-Epte, France

The Château-sur-Epte Castle construction was begun in 1097 by William Rufus, King of England, to reinforce the frontier of Epte. The castle occupied a site on the border between the Duchy of Normandy and the Kingdom of France. In 1119, it was besieged by Louis VI of France and reinforced by the Plantagenets in the 12th century and again during the Hundred Years' War.

In the 12th century, it was restored and reinforced by Henry II of England (keep and entry). Other works were carried out in the 14th century. In 1437, the château was captured by John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury. The castle's role declined in the 16th century and it was ordered to be dismantled by Mazarin in 1647. Transformed into an agricultural centre under the Ancien Régime, it comprised a motte with a stone keep, a lower court linked to the motte and defended by a curtain wall flanked in the east and west by two fortified gateways (14th century), a drawbridge and, in the lower court, a medieval barn, a 17th century corps de logis and a dovecote. The condition of the site deteriorated.

The ruins are private property. It has been listed since 1926 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

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Details

Founded: 1097
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Remydesbois Desbius (2 years ago)
Ruine d'un super château medieval
sandrine kuyo (2 years ago)
Très beau et instruisant
Jean Pierre Pinchon (3 years ago)
Natifs de Bordeaux saint claire je sui près à donner de mon temps et de mon courage pour des travaux de main d’œuvre
Wilfried Meyer (3 years ago)
Après une bonne petite balade, je suis arrivé au chateauneuf sur epte , et la grande émotion devant ce monument avec sûrement une grande histoire !! Il chercher même des bénévoles ;)
isma winter (3 years ago)
Super lieu avec des gens très chaleureux Un plaisir d’avoir aider à la rénovation de ce château
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