Château de Gisors

Gisors, France

The Château de Gisors was a key fortress of the Dukes of Normandy in the 11th and 12th centuries. It was intended to defend the Anglo-Norman Vexin territory from the pretensions of the King of France. King William II of England ordered Robert of Bellême to build the first castle at Gisors. The first building work is dated to about 1095, and consisted of a motte, which was enclosed in a spacious courtyard or bailey. Henry I of England, Duke of Normandy, added an octagonal stone keep to the motte.

In 1193 the castle fell into the hands of the King of France and thereafter lost temporarily its importance as a frontier castle. A second keep, cylindrical in shape, called the Prisoner's Tower, was added to the outer wall of the castle at the start of the 13th century, following the French conquest of Normandy. Further reinforcement was added during the Hundred Years' War. In the 16th century, earthen ramparts were built. Since 1862, Château de Gisors has been recognised as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

Château de Gisors is also known for its links with the Templars. Put into their charge by the French king between 1158 and 1160, it became the final prison of the Grand Master of the Order, Jacques de Molay, in 1314.

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Details

Founded: 1095
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dudu Barkan (2 years ago)
Under works
Christian Rigaux (2 years ago)
Correct
Cris John Clark (3 years ago)
Lovely stop for mo-ho's....market on friday...8 till 1pm....parking at rear/next to gymnasium...river in front...relaxed no problems....will return. Bon !
Alan C (AlanC-LAUK) (4 years ago)
Great location and very easy to visit because there is free parking just outside the entrance. Restorative work is in progress. The inside of the main walls is free to enter but there are no interpretive panels - that’s disappointing. There are guided tours and one in English, see notice (Photo posted) near the gate. Worth visiting.
Gill C (4 years ago)
Lovely park in the centre of Gisors surrounding the foot of the 10th century chateau. Free parking and good access. The Chateau is being restored, there are tours, tickets from tourist information which was closed when we visited (midday Wednesday). Pity, it looked a great place go and explore
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