Château de Gisors

Gisors, France

The Château de Gisors was a key fortress of the Dukes of Normandy in the 11th and 12th centuries. It was intended to defend the Anglo-Norman Vexin territory from the pretensions of the King of France. King William II of England ordered Robert of Bellême to build the first castle at Gisors. The first building work is dated to about 1095, and consisted of a motte, which was enclosed in a spacious courtyard or bailey. Henry I of England, Duke of Normandy, added an octagonal stone keep to the motte.

In 1193 the castle fell into the hands of the King of France and thereafter lost temporarily its importance as a frontier castle. A second keep, cylindrical in shape, called the Prisoner's Tower, was added to the outer wall of the castle at the start of the 13th century, following the French conquest of Normandy. Further reinforcement was added during the Hundred Years' War. In the 16th century, earthen ramparts were built. Since 1862, Château de Gisors has been recognised as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

Château de Gisors is also known for its links with the Templars. Put into their charge by the French king between 1158 and 1160, it became the final prison of the Grand Master of the Order, Jacques de Molay, in 1314.

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Details

Founded: 1095
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karen Paul (9 months ago)
Being from America, seeing something so magnificent is amazing. Granted, we saw it when it was closed, the restoration is coming along beautifully. The sear size of the grounds is wonderful and open. This is one place I would keep coming back to. Every angle is beautiful.
M.F.W. Kellermann (10 months ago)
Not good. What is there is locked up. The gardens are fine but why bother preserving a castle if visitors can not access the towers etc? A very interesting motte, shell keep with donjon and some unique galleries for archers - yet all inaccessible. We visited enroute back to the ferry, so no great loss. However, Gisors is missing out on something. In fact, they are missing out on everything.
Nicholas Fischer (2 years ago)
Was under repairs while there. However it is a beautiful park and the castle is cool and has a view, of you take the tour up to it.
Brielle L-B (2 years ago)
Gorgeous place.
Dudu Barkan (3 years ago)
Under works
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