Maison La Roche

Paris, France

Villa La Roche, also Maison La Roche, is a house in Paris, designed by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret in 1923–1925. It was designed for Raoul La Roche, a Swiss banker and collector of avant-garde art. Villa La Roche now houses the Fondation Le Corbusier.

La Roche-Jeanneret house, is a pair of semi-detached houses that was Corbusier's third commission in Paris. They are laid out at right angles to each other.

In 1928, Le Corbusier and Perriand collaborated on furniture, the fruits of their collaboration were first done for Villa La Roche. The furniture items include, three chrome-plated tubular steel chairs designed for two of his projects, The Maison la Roche in Paris and a pavilion for Barbara and Henry Church.

Maison La Roche is now a museum containing about 8,000 original drawings, studies and plans by Le Corbusier (in collaboration with Pierre Jeanneret from 1922 to 1940), as well as approximately, 450 of his paintings, 30 enamels, 200 works on paper, and a sizeable collection of written and photographic archives. It describes itself as the world's largest collection of Le Corbusier drawings, studies, and plans.

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Founded: 1923-1925
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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Myk Sanchez (9 months ago)
discover Le Corbusier's beginnings here.
Sarah Haddad (9 months ago)
Interesting to see! Not so big, doesn’t take more than around a half hour to see the whole space.
Amarok Sh (11 months ago)
Closed until September 4th
Nico van Harten (12 months ago)
Nice villa, it is quite straightforward.
Afshin Koupaei (3 years ago)
You will have a different understanding of Le Corbusier, even if you are an architect and have studies him for some while. You will get to know the man, much better ...
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