Immeuble locatif à la porte Molitor is the first appartment block in the world with with glazed façades. It was designed by Le Corbusier in 1931-1934. At the Fourth International Congress of Modern Architecture in Athens, Le Corbusier claimed that the elements of planning were: the sky, trees, steel and cement, and in that order and hierarchy. He claimed that the inhabitants of a city who lived with these elements would find themselves holding what he called 'essential joys'. This building serves as a control or prototype. Building regulations in Paris at the time meant there were restrictions for the alignment of buildings to the street. The position of the site was deeply imbedded within the existent urban fabric, hence a challenge arose to design a solution which communicated to the surroundings landscape.

In July 2016, the Molitor building and several other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

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Founded: 1931-1934
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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dimitri Vroonen (4 years ago)
Interesting
yomi matsuoka (4 years ago)
So so. Need to climb 7 stairs and sight is mediocre. The official can be unresponsive. Credit card reader did not work for me. Visit Savoy instead.
Conor Power (4 years ago)
Fascinating immersion into the world of Le Corbusier - a curious man who had the right ideas at the right time.
RUSSELL LEE (4 years ago)
You can see how he thought
Olga Pavlenko (4 years ago)
A must see in Boulogne! Don't forget to book your tour in advance
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