Château de Robert le Diable

La Londe, France

The Château de Robert le Diable (also known as Château de Moulineaux) was a feudal castle from the time of the Dukes of Normandy. It is named after Robert the Devil who was also known as Robert de Montgomery and Robert le Magnifique ('the magnificent'). He was the Duke of Normandy and father of William the Conqueror. However, there is no evidence that this person was involved in the construction.

The castle was built during the 11th and 12th centuries. It stands on a hill which dominates the River Seine, the view extending over the whole Rouen region, making it a particularly strategic location. It is known that the English King Richard I ('Lionheart') stayed here. His brother, King John ('Lackland') destroyed the castle during his struggle with the King of France Philip II Augustus. The castle was rebuilt in 1378 by the Lord of Sefton. During the Hundred Years War, the people of Rouen destroyed the towers to prevent the castle being used by the English. Half ruined, it is today furnished with various artefacts as well as reconstructed scenes of local history and life in the Middle Ages. The castle is privately owned.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simon Taylor (6 months ago)
Nice castle ruins. Cost nothing to look. You'll only spend 10 minutes there though ?
Jeff Tinker (13 months ago)
Simple and beautiful view into the past IG: @justtinker
Aurore Letzelter Humbrecht (15 months ago)
Simple and beautiful ruines with panoramic view and picnic tables
Mr. Pete (17 months ago)
It is not a big castle but worth to see.
Roberta LaMarr (3 years ago)
Smaller than I thought but interesting. Great descriptions throughout
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