Château de Tancarville

Tancarville, France

Château de Tancarville was built in the 11th century by Raoul, the chamberlain of Dukes of Normandy. In the 12th century the square tower was built with 1.65m thick walls. In 1418 at the time of the conquest of Normandy by Henry V of England, the title of Earl of Tancarville was given to John Grey. After the Hundred Years War the Harcourt family restored the castle. The ballroom was built in 1468. In 1709 the castle was partially rebuilt by the Count of Evreux. After 1789, the castle was plundered and partly burned. In the 1960s , the castle served as a summer camp for children.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stéphanie Joignant (12 months ago)
Beau mais en ruine
Didier Seite (13 months ago)
Superbe lieu en ruine par manque de sérieux des propriétaires et autres instances publiques locales.
Carlos Pardo (15 months ago)
Incredible castle, mix various epoch and styles. Not open to public and in an advanced abandon state. A shame!
graham (17 months ago)
Really beautiful, to bad its closed for public and that they don't do anything with it anymore. Could be a really nice location for small festivals or wedding partys. Or even a hotel.
Martin Guzon (18 months ago)
Super
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