La Varde Passage Grave

Guernsey, United Kingdom

La Varde is an 11m long bottle shaped passage grave with 6 capstones and a small oval recess towards the rear. It dates back to Neolithic Age (3000-2500 BC). Originally covered by a mound 18m in diameter and a peristalith. The mound has been partially restored and two capstones are supported by modern pillars. Two layers of paving were recorded above and between which burnt and unburnt human bones, limpet shells and pebbles were found. Fragments of some 150 Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pots were also recovered as well as flint, stone tools, a serpentine ring, Gallo-Roman pottery, querns and fragments of bronze. The chamber had been sealed with a dry stone wall and also included a small slab lined cist set into the floor.

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User Reviews

Hugh (16 months ago)
Another excellent historic burial site on Guernsey that is easy to find just by the millennium stone. Totally worth visiting, only takes a few minutes but is a very interesting few minutes.
Robert Fletcher (2 years ago)
Ancient burial ground
Ian Chamberlain (2 years ago)
You can't really miss it.Head for the obelisk on the hill and the burial chamber is only a few metres away.It is surprisingly big.The only downside is I couldn't find the Les Fouaiillages chamber.The obelisk is relatively new.Placed there to park the millennium.Worth a visit.
Paul Savident (2 years ago)
So calming, and particularly at a summer sunset. ?
sharon coombes (2 years ago)
Beautiful
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