La Varde Passage Grave

Guernsey, United Kingdom

La Varde is an 11m long bottle shaped passage grave with 6 capstones and a small oval recess towards the rear. It dates back to Neolithic Age (3000-2500 BC). Originally covered by a mound 18m in diameter and a peristalith. The mound has been partially restored and two capstones are supported by modern pillars. Two layers of paving were recorded above and between which burnt and unburnt human bones, limpet shells and pebbles were found. Fragments of some 150 Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pots were also recovered as well as flint, stone tools, a serpentine ring, Gallo-Roman pottery, querns and fragments of bronze. The chamber had been sealed with a dry stone wall and also included a small slab lined cist set into the floor.

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User Reviews

Michael Jolly (3 years ago)
Needs some tlc
Jacek Bargielski (3 years ago)
GUERNSEY
Justin Nash (3 years ago)
Wow, fantastic neolithic site. You can get inside and really get a sense of things. It's hidden away on a golf course, but easy enough to find
Ysa W (3 years ago)
Présence de dolmens néolithiques localisés au milieu du golf. Édifications datées entre 4000 et 2500 avant-JC.
Robin Robilliard (3 years ago)
Excellent service thanks lovely views.
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