Originally known as Sancti Petri de Portu, many regard the Town Church as the Cathedral Church and the finest in the Channel Islands. The first mention of the church in official documents was in 1048 when it is thought to have been given to the Abbot of Marmoutier by William of Normandy. It is likely that the original building was made of wood. The current building was built over a 200 year period with the chancel completed in the 12th century and the chapel added in 1462. The church was completed in 1475. However restoration work was carried out to the spire in 1721. The bells were recast in 1736 and in 1913. The clock was installed in 1781. Up until 1886, the rows of pews went in various directions and at that time some re-alignment was undertaken.

A copy of the text of an order from Pope Sixtus IV granting neutrality to the island is displayed in the church. In 1414, the English Crown took over the church but interestingly the church paid tithes to the Bishop of Coutanches until 1548. Up until the middle 1700's, the Church was completely surrounded by street markets and houses. A stream ran past the Church and around the harbour near to Woolworths. A memorial to the famous islander Major General Sir Isaac Brock can be found inside the Church together with many other memorials.

In 2001, work started on repairing the 500 year old oak vaulted rafters in the roof, which are now rare in England and believed to be the last surviving of this type in the Channel Islands. The joints are now quite weak and are being strengthened with stainless steel plates on the ridges, but the beams themselves remain in good condition. They work the subject of public outcry when the church decided to replace the rafters in 2000, but the Ecclesiastical Court decided after taking expert advice, that the roof could be saved.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

www.islandlife.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ale Johnson (2 years ago)
I loved the service from this church will visit you again thank you.
leonard flaviu (2 years ago)
amazing church... I peaceful place and love
Steven James (2 years ago)
Lovely church to look around while visiting Guernsey.The stained glass windows are simply amazing to look at.
Paul Thomson (2 years ago)
Lovely church and plenty of history
Richard Ians (3 years ago)
This is the church at the heart of St Peter Port, and has a very long history as the main church of Guernsey. Worth a visit.
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