Originally known as Sancti Petri de Portu, many regard the Town Church as the Cathedral Church and the finest in the Channel Islands. The first mention of the church in official documents was in 1048 when it is thought to have been given to the Abbot of Marmoutier by William of Normandy. It is likely that the original building was made of wood. The current building was built over a 200 year period with the chancel completed in the 12th century and the chapel added in 1462. The church was completed in 1475. However restoration work was carried out to the spire in 1721. The bells were recast in 1736 and in 1913. The clock was installed in 1781. Up until 1886, the rows of pews went in various directions and at that time some re-alignment was undertaken.

A copy of the text of an order from Pope Sixtus IV granting neutrality to the island is displayed in the church. In 1414, the English Crown took over the church but interestingly the church paid tithes to the Bishop of Coutanches until 1548. Up until the middle 1700's, the Church was completely surrounded by street markets and houses. A stream ran past the Church and around the harbour near to Woolworths. A memorial to the famous islander Major General Sir Isaac Brock can be found inside the Church together with many other memorials.

In 2001, work started on repairing the 500 year old oak vaulted rafters in the roof, which are now rare in England and believed to be the last surviving of this type in the Channel Islands. The joints are now quite weak and are being strengthened with stainless steel plates on the ridges, but the beams themselves remain in good condition. They work the subject of public outcry when the church decided to replace the rafters in 2000, but the Ecclesiastical Court decided after taking expert advice, that the roof could be saved.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

www.islandlife.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Donny Brock (10 months ago)
I ring here and it is really friendly would definately recommend it
Richard De La Rue (12 months ago)
The Town Church of St Peter Port is a fine building in which its Christian ministry is shared by two excellent priests. The Church has a fine choir in the English cathedral tradition.
Terence Lee (18 months ago)
A really nice place very interesting and humble well worth the visit
Lisa Robins (2 years ago)
As a building, beautiful. I'm not religious but did pop in recently and it is gorgeous inside. Also beautiful outside, the gargoyle on one corner means that it is the closest church to a pub in the British Isles! Worth a visit if you are religious, like churches or thinking about the concept of God. Note for tourists, the taxi rank right outside is often not populated so be prepared for a little walk across Town or know a number to call if you want a taxi from there.
David (2 years ago)
A lovely church in a lovely location with lots of history and much of it displayed on the walls. It is cool on a hot day and when I found the quiet area to pray in I did feel a sense of calm which was a moment of relief to escape the commercial work outside the church. Well worth a visit!
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