Saint-Georges de Boscherville Abbey is a former Benedictine abbey. It was founded in about 1113 by Guillaume de Tancarville on the site of an earlier establishment of secular canons and settled by monks from the Abbey of Saint-Evroul. The abbey church made of Caumont stone was erected from 1113 to 1140. The Norman builders aimed to have very well-lit naves and they did this by means of tall, large windows, initially made possible by a wooden ceiling, which prevented uplift, although this was replaced by a Gothic vault in the 13th century. The chapter room was built after the abbey church and dates from the last quarter of the 12th century.

The arrival of the Maurist monks in 1659, after the disasters of the Wars of Religion, helped to get the abbey back on a firmer spiritual, architectural and economic footing. They erected a large monastic building one wing of which fitted tightly around the chapter house (which was otherwise left as it was). The symmetrical wing was used solely for the library - the monks were extremely learned. All that remains is the central part of this restored building. Once again we can see the splendour of its complex vaults which play on the colour of the stones. This building, erected in the classical style from 1690 to 1694, gave onto gardens upon which work began in 1680.

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Founded: 1113
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jean-François REVEL (3 years ago)
Une splendeur toujours renouvelée Je suis allé à pied jusqu'à Compostelle sans en voir une aussi belle
Karin Schumann (3 years ago)
Schöne romanische Kirche und großer Garten. Hunde dürfen an der Leine in die Parkanlagen. Auch einige andere Innenräume zu besichtigen. Schöner, gemütlicher Museumsladen, in den unser kleiner Hund hinein durfte.
Alice Duporge (3 years ago)
Audioguide gratuit très pratique, jolis jardins et cloître !
Dominique Merieult (3 years ago)
Construite sur un site sacré dont l'origine remonterait à l'époque gallo romaine. Les premiers travaux ont débuté au XII ème siècle. L'abbaye met en évidence cinq grandes structures . Visite incontournable. .
Mario Westphal (4 years ago)
Very old.....12th century....
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At the end of the 13th century the Liechtensteins, originally from Styria, became holders of all of Lednice and of nearby Mikulov. They gradually acquired land on both sides of the Moravian-Austrian border. Members of the family most often found fame in military service, during the Renaissance they expanded their estates through economic activity. From the middle of the 15th century members of the family occupied the highest offices in the land. However, the family’s position in Moravia really changed under the brothers Karel, Maximilian, and Gundakar of Liechtenstein. Through marriage Karel and Maximilian acquired the great wealth of the old Moravian dynasty of the Černohorskýs of Boskovice. At that time the brothers, like their father and grandfather, were Lutheran, but they soon converted to Catholicism, thus preparing the ground for their rise in politics. Particularly Karel, who served at the court of Emperor Rudolf II, became hetman of Moravia in 1608, and was later raised to princely status by King Matyas II and awarded the Duchy of Opava.

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In the 16th century it was probably Hartmann II of Liechtenstein who had the old medieval water castle torn down and replaced with a Renaissance chateau. At the end of the 17th century the chateau was torn down and a Baroque palace was built, with an extensive formal garden, and a massive riding hall designed by Johann Bernard Fischer von Erlach that still stands in almost unaltered form.

In the mid-18th century the chateau was again renovated, and in 1815 its front tracts that had been part of the Baroque chateau were removed.

The chateau as it looks today dates from 1846-1858, when Prince Alois II decided that Vienna was not suitable for entertaining in the summer, and had Lednice rebuilt into a summer palace in the spirit of English Gothic. The hall on the ground floor would serve to entertain the European aristocracy at sumptuous banquets, and was furnished with carved wood ceilings, wooden panelling, and select furniture, surpassing anything of its kind in Europe.