The Sainte-Gaubuge priory was originally a hamlet, which is very well preserved. All the houses are located around the priory. The church building dates from the 13th, 15th and 18th century. The canons of St. Denis are at the origin of the most beautiful architecture sites. Rich carved decorations (13th and 15th century), the house of the prior has magnificent chimneys listed (15th century), and the vaults (13th century) are worth of seeing. Guided tours are available.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

pierre Mounier (12 months ago)
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Suzy Feuillet (2 years ago)
In the past all the work was manual except for a very old tractor it reminded of things used in the past like the billhook a pleasant place to visit
séverine lemoigne (2 years ago)
Very interesting museum with many tools and objects to illustrate the different Percheron trades in the past
Gilles Bataille (2 years ago)
Small, very nice and affordable museum (free for children under 18) which allows visitors to discover the history and know-how of a territory and a bygone era. The priory and its orchard are to be discovered! Friendly and attentive welcome, thank you!
Ophélie Delaby (2 years ago)
Very friendly welcome, The visit to the museum is interesting, the explanations are well notified, the rooms are interesting, my partner and I love the floor, the objects are well presented because the universes are very distinct. The visit of the priory is instructive but .. It still lacks explanatory panels on certain things, especially in the courtyard behind, on the trees, etc. In any case we loved this visit, we will definitely come back.
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