Montebourg Abbey

Montebourg, France

Montebourg Abbey was probably established by William the Conqueror after the invasion to England (1066). The exact date is unknown, but it was before William's death in 1087. The abbey got lot of donations from the Dukes of Normandy and Kings of England until the 1180s. It had a large land property even in the southern England and the abbey grew up quickly in the 12th century.

The abbey suffered damages in the Hundred Years' War, but it was renovated in the mid-15th century. In 1562 Huguenots looted the abbey during the Frencg Wars of Religion. The first school in Montebourg was established in 1585 and in the 18th century it was used as Catholic poor house and rest home. But soon after the Great Revolution caused the decline of Montebourg Abbey. It was reduced to the state and monastic buildings were partially demolished. In 1842, the Vicar General of Coutances acquired what was by then only an enclosure of ruins, and set it up for the Brothers of Mercy, which he had just formed in order to promote Catholic education in the countryside. From there, the brothers have continued their work.

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Details

Founded: 1066-1087
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.abbayes-normandes.com

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TheReal Nordik (2 years ago)
Adrien Travert (4 years ago)
Elizabeth-Jeanne Gosselin (4 years ago)
Une Église Abbatiale intéressante pour son architecture et magnifique grâce à une restauration efficace de bon goût. L'abbaye en impose par ses nombreux bâtiments.
Mihawk (5 years ago)
Collège nul et dégrader :( je suis en 4 em
Ludovic F. (6 years ago)
Magnifique abbaye qui fait office d école
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