Bayeux War Cemetery

Bayeux, France

The Bayeux War Cemetery is the largest Second World War cemetery of Commonwealth soldiers in France. The cemetery contains 4,648 burials, mostly of the Invasion of Normandy. Opposite this cemetery stands the Bayeux Memorial which commemorates 1,808 casualties of the Commonwealth forces who died in Normandy and have no known grave.

The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by France in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defense and liberation of France during the war. In addition to the Commonwealth burials, there are 466 graves of German soldiers.

The cemetery contains the Cross of Sacrifice or War Cross, designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC). Queen Elizabeth II and President of France Jacques Chirac attended ceremonies at the cemetery on June 6, 2004, marking the 60th anniversary of the D-Day invasion.

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Details

Founded: 1944
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Jones (2 years ago)
Peaceful but beautiful well set out
Elizabeth Smith (2 years ago)
The cemetery was beautiful and more interesting and moving than I expected. It is especially interesting to seek out the headstones from the variety of countries represented.
Zsolt Völgyesi (2 years ago)
Obligatory. Touching. British and German soldiers buried in the same ground. Heartbreaking.
Frank Gulemmo (2 years ago)
Visited with my British friends in the summer of 2017. This cemetery is very well kept and is quite beautiful. Each headstone has the name and the division of the brave soldier who fought for all of our freedoms that we take for granted today. God save the queen, Viva la France, and God bless America.
John Isaacs (2 years ago)
A beautiful cemetery , we were passing and stopped to pay our respects to those that had given their lives for our freedom. As with all the war cemetery's they are kept so tidy and are so very beautiful and peaceful. Lest we forget.
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