Bayeux War Cemetery

Bayeux, France

The Bayeux War Cemetery is the largest Second World War cemetery of Commonwealth soldiers in France. The cemetery contains 4,648 burials, mostly of the Invasion of Normandy. Opposite this cemetery stands the Bayeux Memorial which commemorates 1,808 casualties of the Commonwealth forces who died in Normandy and have no known grave.

The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by France in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defense and liberation of France during the war. In addition to the Commonwealth burials, there are 466 graves of German soldiers.

The cemetery contains the Cross of Sacrifice or War Cross, designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC). Queen Elizabeth II and President of France Jacques Chirac attended ceremonies at the cemetery on June 6, 2004, marking the 60th anniversary of the D-Day invasion.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1944
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Jones (3 years ago)
Peaceful but beautiful well set out
Elizabeth Smith (3 years ago)
The cemetery was beautiful and more interesting and moving than I expected. It is especially interesting to seek out the headstones from the variety of countries represented.
Zsolt Völgyesi (3 years ago)
Obligatory. Touching. British and German soldiers buried in the same ground. Heartbreaking.
Frank Gulemmo (3 years ago)
Visited with my British friends in the summer of 2017. This cemetery is very well kept and is quite beautiful. Each headstone has the name and the division of the brave soldier who fought for all of our freedoms that we take for granted today. God save the queen, Viva la France, and God bless America.
John Isaacs (3 years ago)
A beautiful cemetery , we were passing and stopped to pay our respects to those that had given their lives for our freedom. As with all the war cemetery's they are kept so tidy and are so very beautiful and peaceful. Lest we forget.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Royal Palace of Olite

The Palace of the Kings of Navarre of Olite was one of the seats of the Court of the Kingdom of Navarre, since the reign of Charles III 'the Noble' until its conquest by Castile (1512). The fortification is both castle and palace, although it was built more like a courtier building to fulfill a military function.

On an ancient Roman fortification was built during the reign of Sancho VII of Navarre (13th century) and extended by his successors Theobald I and Theobald II, which the latter was is installed in the palace in 1269 and there he signed the consent letter for the wedding of Blanche of Artois with his brother Henry I of Navarre, who in turn, Henry I since 1271 used the palace as a temporary residence. This ancient area is known as the Old Palace.

Then the palace was housing the Navarrese court from the 14th until 16th centuries, Since the annexation (integration) of the kingdom of Navarre for the Crown of Castile in 1512 began the decline of the castle and therefore its practically neglect and deterioration. At that time it was an official residence for the Viceroys of Navarre.

In 1813 Navarrese guerrilla fighter Espoz y Mina during the Napoleonic French Invasion burned the palace with the aim to French could not make forts in it, which almost brought in ruin. It is since 1937 when architects José and Javier Yarnoz Larrosa began the rehabilitation (except the non-damaged church) for the castle palace, giving it back its original appearance and see today. The restoration work was completed in 1967 and was paid by the Foral Government of Navarre.