Tampere Orthodox Church

Tampere, Finland

The Orthodox church of Tampere was built in Russian romantic style, with onion style cupolas, and was completed in 1899. The architect of the Russian army, T.U. Jasikov, drew the floor plan. The church was consecrated in 1899 to Saint Alexander Nevsky, a Novgorodian who in 1240 fought against the Catholic Swedes and two years later the Catholic Teutonic Knights with equal success, and was accordingly canoniced for these nationalistic but bloody deeds. Emperor Nicholas II donated the bells to this church. The church suffered heavily during the Finnish civil war in 1918 and most of the movables were disappeared or destroyed. The reconstruction took several years. After Finland declared its independence, it was re-consecrated to St. Nicholas, a less belligerent saint.

The Orthodox Church is considered to be one of the most beautiful buildings in Tampere. Indeed, it is even said that it is the finest masterpiece of Byzantine-style architecture in the Nordic countries.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1896-1899
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TH3 TR/\V1R (8 months ago)
Pretty Russian orthodox church close to Tampere city center.
chengcheng sheng (11 months ago)
This is my first time to enter the Orthodox church, and I was amazed by the decoration inside, very magnificent and beautiful
Adriano Bueno (11 months ago)
Amazing place, you really must pay a visit
Peeti Saarinen (12 months ago)
This might be one of the smallest but at the same time one of the most gorgeous-looking orthodox churches out there. The church is situated in the middle of the city very close to the shopping mall Ratina and the Tampere railway -and bus station.
Mimi.1st (2 years ago)
Cozy, friendly atmosphere and warm
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