Tampere Orthodox Church

Tampere, Finland

The Orthodox church of Tampere was built in Russian romantic style, with onion style cupolas, and was completed in 1899. The architect of the Russian army, T.U. Jasikov, drew the floor plan. The church was consecrated in 1899 to Saint Alexander Nevsky, a Novgorodian who in 1240 fought against the Catholic Swedes and two years later the Catholic Teutonic Knights with equal success, and was accordingly canoniced for these nationalistic but bloody deeds. Emperor Nicholas II donated the bells to this church. The church suffered heavily during the Finnish civil war in 1918 and most of the movables were disappeared or destroyed. The reconstruction took several years. After Finland declared its independence, it was re-consecrated to St. Nicholas, a less belligerent saint.

The Orthodox Church is considered to be one of the most beautiful buildings in Tampere. Indeed, it is even said that it is the finest masterpiece of Byzantine-style architecture in the Nordic countries.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1896-1899
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

eila lamminen (2 years ago)
Liikuntarajoitteisen on hankala mennä mäkeä, kirkkoon on kyllä nostin ulko-ovitasanteelle. Sisällä voi istua reunapenkeillä. Kaunis kirkko, kirkolliset toimitukset kauniita, mieleenpainuvia.
Irene Cotrina (2 years ago)
This small orthodox church makes such a beautiful view with its russian style architecture. Perched up in a higher level than the adjacent square, it is surrounded by pine trees and emitting a sense of serenity in the winter with the snow or when the sun sets.
Bogdan Longawa (2 years ago)
Sama świątynia wyglądała okazale i tak poważnie podświetlona reflektorami w styczniową zimną i mroźną noc. Niestety nie mieliśmy okazji i chęci zobaczyć ja od środka. Cerkiew ma to do siebie że zdobienia i klimat jest dla mnie zawsze nastrajający i wprowadzający w zadumę.
Mikko (3 years ago)
One of the only illustrations of byzantine architecture in Tampere! Built by a Russian military architect, this building commemorates two saints (Alexander Nevsky and Saint Nicholas) and is located at the Sori square, a very pleasant destination, albeit close to adjacent, perpetual loud traffic. In the middle of this square, staring at the church, you will find another work of art, a mysterious looking monolith, a granite block named simply "Pirkka" by an artist named Harry Kivijärvi, God rest his soul. Visit this place, you will not be Sori!
Koos De Beer (3 years ago)
Excellent example of the times architecture. Easy to reach.
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