Amuri Museum of Workers' Housing

Tampere, Finland

Starting from the 19th century, Amuri was originally mainly a residence area for the workers of the Finlayson factory. It consisted of blocks of wooden houses built together, which were replaced by low-rise apartment buildings in the 1970s and 1980s. In the Amuri Museum of Workers' Housing a part of old Amuri is preserved. The museum features five residential buildings that still stand in their original locations and four outbuildings. The 32 apartments represent different ages from the 1880s to the 1970s. Interiors, which are from different periods, illustrate the life of local industrial workers.

You can also stop by at the charmingly quaint café Amurin Helmi for a refreshing cup of coffee and a slice of the local traditional yeast bread or a tasty bun. Guided tours (also in English) are available in summer season.

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Details

Founded: 1880-1970s
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Irene Cotrina (2 years ago)
One of the places in Finland that I remember with much fondness. A museum about every day life and common household objects in a small, industrialised city in the beginnings of 20th century. It is appropriately located in an old part of Tampere and consisting of a cluster of traditional wooden houses. Each room in every house has its particular furniture and some personal items of the lodgers, along with a description of who resided there, what was his occupation and family status etc. Most of the people were workers in factories, like Finlayson and lived with their family members in just one room. A sole kitchen was attached to every house to be used commonly by all families. Sauna and bakery can also be visited. There is a lovely restaurant/coffee shop in the grounds offering Finnish fare. On fair weather there are tables outdoors too. Warmly recommended!
Joni Kamarainen (2 years ago)
Best traditional bakings - pulla and karjalanpiirakka munavoilla :-)
Paola F (2 years ago)
A fantastic example of time travel through the visit of many well-furnished houses in the style of the years from 1800 onwards. Staff very kind and friendly. It is possible to stop in the cafeteria to taste Finnish delicacies.
Tiina Uusi-Rasi (2 years ago)
Idyllic opportunity to take a peek at how Finland was at the time of industrialization and how people lived in cities way back in the time. Lovely short stories of the occupants and a small but worth it cafe-bakery.
Joonas Heloterä (2 years ago)
A very pleasant 1-hour walk through the Amuri and Tampere history of the near centuries. 7e soup lunch in the cafeteria absolutely worth!
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