Amuri Museum of Workers' Housing

Tampere, Finland

Starting from the 19th century, Amuri was originally mainly a residence area for the workers of the Finlayson factory. It consisted of blocks of wooden houses built together, which were replaced by low-rise apartment buildings in the 1970s and 1980s. In the Amuri Museum of Workers' Housing a part of old Amuri is preserved. The museum features five residential buildings that still stand in their original locations and four outbuildings. The 32 apartments represent different ages from the 1880s to the 1970s. Interiors, which are from different periods, illustrate the life of local industrial workers.

You can also stop by at the charmingly quaint café Amurin Helmi for a refreshing cup of coffee and a slice of the local traditional yeast bread or a tasty bun. Guided tours (also in English) are available in summer season.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1880-1970s
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Irene Cotrina (4 months ago)
One of the places in Finland that I remember with much fondness. A museum about every day life and common household objects in a small, industrialised city in the beginnings of 20th century. It is appropriately located in an old part of Tampere and consisting of a cluster of traditional wooden houses. Each room in every house has its particular furniture and some personal items of the lodgers, along with a description of who resided there, what was his occupation and family status etc. Most of the people were workers in factories, like Finlayson and lived with their family members in just one room. A sole kitchen was attached to every house to be used commonly by all families. Sauna and bakery can also be visited. There is a lovely restaurant/coffee shop in the grounds offering Finnish fare. On fair weather there are tables outdoors too. Warmly recommended!
Joni Kamarainen (4 months ago)
Best traditional bakings - pulla and karjalanpiirakka munavoilla :-)
Paola F (5 months ago)
A fantastic example of time travel through the visit of many well-furnished houses in the style of the years from 1800 onwards. Staff very kind and friendly. It is possible to stop in the cafeteria to taste Finnish delicacies.
Tiina Uusi-Rasi (5 months ago)
Idyllic opportunity to take a peek at how Finland was at the time of industrialization and how people lived in cities way back in the time. Lovely short stories of the occupants and a small but worth it cafe-bakery.
Joonas Heloterä (6 months ago)
A very pleasant 1-hour walk through the Amuri and Tampere history of the near centuries. 7e soup lunch in the cafeteria absolutely worth!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Decin Castle

Perched atop its cliff where the Ploučnice meets the Elbe, Děčín Castle is one of the oldest and largest landmarks in northern Bohemia. In the past several hundred years it has served as a point of control for the Bohemian princes, a military fortress, and noble estate.

The forerunner of the Děčín Castle was a wooden fortress built towards the end of the 10th century by the Bohemian princes. The first written record of the province dates from 993 A.D. and of the fortress itself from 1128. In the thirteenth century it was rebuilt in stone as a royal castle that, under unknown circumstances, fell into the hands of the powerful Wartenberg dynasty around 1305.

Numerous later renovations has erased all but fragments of the original medieval semblance of the castle. A significant change to the castle came in the second half of the 16th century when it was held by the Saxon Knights of Bünau, who gradually rebuilt the lower castle into a Renaissance palace with a grand ceremonial hall. The current semblance of the castle is the work of the Thun-Hohensteins, who held the Děčín lands from 1628 to 1932. The Thuns originally came from southern Tyrol and gradually worked their way to the upper echelons of Hapsburg society where they regularly filled important political and church appointments.

The Thuns reworked the castle twice. The first reconstruction, in the Baroque style, was undertaken by Maximilian von Thun, Imperial envoy and diplomat, and was meant to enhance the ceremonial aspects of the property. A central element of the project was a grand access road, the Long Drive, ending in the upper gate of the completely rebuilt entry wing. Along the drive stretched an ornamental garden (today known as the Rose Garden) and a riding yard. Maximilian’s brother Johann Ernst von Thun was responsible for the erection of the Church of the Ascension of the Holy Cross in the town below.

The second and final reconstruction of the castle was undertaken in 1786–1803. The Gothic and Renaissance palaces were torn down, all structures were leveled to the same height and gave them a unified facade. On the riverfront the castle's new dominant feature arose, a slender clock tower. Thus the castle took on the Baroque-Classical style we see today.

In the course of the 19th century, the castle became an important cultural and political center. In the 20th century the castle was used as a military garrison for German and Soviet troops after being handed to the Czechoslovak state in 1932. In 1991 the castle reverted to the ownership of the city of Děčín and the gradual renovation of the devastated structure began.

The eastern wing serves as a branch of the Děčín Regional Museum. The northern wing is occupied by the State District Archives. The staterooms of the western wing welcome individual and group tours, weddings, concerts, exhibits, and other cultural events. The castle courtyard comes to life throughout the year with events ranging from the Historic May Fair to the Wine Festival in September.