Amuri Museum of Workers' Housing

Tampere, Finland

Starting from the 19th century, Amuri was originally mainly a residence area for the workers of the Finlayson factory. It consisted of blocks of wooden houses built together, which were replaced by low-rise apartment buildings in the 1970s and 1980s. In the Amuri Museum of Workers' Housing a part of old Amuri is preserved. The museum features five residential buildings that still stand in their original locations and four outbuildings. The 32 apartments represent different ages from the 1880s to the 1970s. Interiors, which are from different periods, illustrate the life of local industrial workers.

You can also stop by at the charmingly quaint café Amurin Helmi for a refreshing cup of coffee and a slice of the local traditional yeast bread or a tasty bun. Guided tours (also in English) are available in summer season.

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Details

Founded: 1880-1970s
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ousman Manga (15 months ago)
Nice place with rich history!!
Petri Vahtera (15 months ago)
Here one can get to know Finnish working class history from mid 1800 to 1970's. Great museum to visit!
Lari Wennström (20 months ago)
Idyllic place. See how the district of Amuri used to look like and how the workers lived. Sip a tea or two at the Amurin Helmi cafe.
Barbara Brodnicka-Taskinen (21 months ago)
Great and cosy place, must stop for a cup of coffee or breakfast :-)
A I (22 months ago)
Warm reception by staff at the cash desk, tidy and plenty of space inside. Good food and on Street four hour parking. Good location.
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