Château d'Acquigny

Acquigny, France

Acquigny sits at the confluence of two rivers: the Eure, formerly navigable to Chartres, and the Iton. The two rivers were dammed and redirected during the twelfth century by the monks of Conches-en-Ouche to power mills in the region. These newly created branches also fed into the castle's moats protecting the Saint-mals monastery and the medieval village located directly behind the current castle.

During the Hundred Year's War, following the imprisonment of Charles II of Navarre in 1356, Acquigny played a notable role. Due its strategic importance it was an important stronghold for both English and French armies. The original castle was situated in the exact location as the current castle and was surrounded by high walls and wide ditches which flowed in the river Eure.

The present castle was built in 1557 by Anne de Laval, widow of Louis Silly, cousin of the king and first lady of honor Catherine de Medici. She wanted the architects Philibert Delorme and Jacques Androuet Hoop to design a castle inspired by the eternal love she bore for her husband. The castle's crest is made from their four initials intertwined. This influence produced a complex and a unique structure of rare elegance. On the center turret there is a superimposed scallop shell in tribute to the Way of St. James. This facade of honor is coated with many other decorative elements that celebrate the exceptional love she held for her family.

The castle was purchased in 1656 by Claude Roux Cambremont. In 1745, Peter Robert Roux Esneval, known as the President of Acquigny and the great grand son of Claude Roux Cambremont, expanded the castle. Peter Robert Roux Esneval employed architect Charles Thibault to rebuild the chapel of Saint-mals as well as stables and sheds. It was at this time that the orangery was built along with the church and the Little Castle that was designed to be attached to a hermitage.

The President of Acquigny was a deeply religious man. After rebuilding the church, he chose to live the remainder of his life as a hermit, while strictly adhering to his religious beliefs and the Grande Trappe. From the pavilion end, he could attend services celebrated in the church. The architecture of this construction is simple, and harmonious. The play of colors - Blue slate and pink brick pink set on white stone - and symmetry play an essential role in the beauty and balance of this monument.

The vast park created during the 17th century follows a circular route. The forest is filled with large chestnut trees over two hundred years old and drawing comparison stopping at a vegetable garden, the orangery and there are around the vegetable, the general route of the water body perpendicular, but the rows of trees and flower beds are symmetrical disappeared. However, beautiful limes or large chestnuts who have freed themselves from their geometric shape beautify the wood. Two major elements, the garden and orangery, regained some of their former glory.

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Details

Founded: 1557
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olga Mbui (21 months ago)
Endroit idéal pour une bonne ballade au bord de l eau
clement lemoine (2 years ago)
Vraiment nul pour une journée patrimoniale ,il n'y a quasi rien dans les jardins , ok reposant mais autant aller autre part pour ne pas avoir la possibilité de visiter le château alors que c'est la base de la visite.. Les agents d'accueil ne le disent pas car en restauration.. Autant ne pas ouvrir les portes
Anelyse Varnier (2 years ago)
Un parc bien entretenu sur les bords de l'eure. Il y est agréable de se promener Et flâner dans le jardin, ou autour des orangers . C'est une très belle surprise . Le prix me paraît tout de même excessif, d'où les 3 étoiles
DAVID FLO (2 years ago)
Charmant jardin. Balade agréable en couple ou adulte. Se fait doucement afin d'apprécier, nombreux bancs pour s'asseoir. À la fois ombragé ou au soleil. En bordure de l'eure. Le château est actuellement fermé. Ne loupez pas le potager tout au fond du parc
katia romeo (2 years ago)
Non è corretto far pagare 8 euro a persona per visitare un castello con una sola piccola stanza molto disordinata che esponeva un paio di oggetti presi alla rinfusa in un qualsiasi rigattiere. Anche solo quella stanza tenuta bene e arredata con un po di gusto ( non necessariamente spendendo grandi cifre) e un cartello che spiegasse qualcosa della storia del castello, questo avrebbe reso meno trascurato il luogo. Il parco ha alberi bellissimi e secolari ma anche questo è non curato.
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