Château d'Acquigny

Acquigny, France

Acquigny sits at the confluence of two rivers: the Eure, formerly navigable to Chartres, and the Iton. The two rivers were dammed and redirected during the twelfth century by the monks of Conches-en-Ouche to power mills in the region. These newly created branches also fed into the castle's moats protecting the Saint-mals monastery and the medieval village located directly behind the current castle.

During the Hundred Year's War, following the imprisonment of Charles II of Navarre in 1356, Acquigny played a notable role. Due its strategic importance it was an important stronghold for both English and French armies. The original castle was situated in the exact location as the current castle and was surrounded by high walls and wide ditches which flowed in the river Eure.

The present castle was built in 1557 by Anne de Laval, widow of Louis Silly, cousin of the king and first lady of honor Catherine de Medici. She wanted the architects Philibert Delorme and Jacques Androuet Hoop to design a castle inspired by the eternal love she bore for her husband. The castle's crest is made from their four initials intertwined. This influence produced a complex and a unique structure of rare elegance. On the center turret there is a superimposed scallop shell in tribute to the Way of St. James. This facade of honor is coated with many other decorative elements that celebrate the exceptional love she held for her family.

The castle was purchased in 1656 by Claude Roux Cambremont. In 1745, Peter Robert Roux Esneval, known as the President of Acquigny and the great grand son of Claude Roux Cambremont, expanded the castle. Peter Robert Roux Esneval employed architect Charles Thibault to rebuild the chapel of Saint-mals as well as stables and sheds. It was at this time that the orangery was built along with the church and the Little Castle that was designed to be attached to a hermitage.

The President of Acquigny was a deeply religious man. After rebuilding the church, he chose to live the remainder of his life as a hermit, while strictly adhering to his religious beliefs and the Grande Trappe. From the pavilion end, he could attend services celebrated in the church. The architecture of this construction is simple, and harmonious. The play of colors - Blue slate and pink brick pink set on white stone - and symmetry play an essential role in the beauty and balance of this monument.

The vast park created during the 17th century follows a circular route. The forest is filled with large chestnut trees over two hundred years old and drawing comparison stopping at a vegetable garden, the orangery and there are around the vegetable, the general route of the water body perpendicular, but the rows of trees and flower beds are symmetrical disappeared. However, beautiful limes or large chestnuts who have freed themselves from their geometric shape beautify the wood. Two major elements, the garden and orangery, regained some of their former glory.

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Details

Founded: 1557
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cricri en mode Captain Tortue Christelle Maupas (3 months ago)
I didn't live far away. But I had never taken the time to visit it and it is really very beautiful. We have the impression of being transported elsewhere, far from noise and pollution. A peaceful, colorful and charming place.
C. (4 months ago)
8 euros Holiday vouchers Dogs allowed on leash Superb area that is worth the detour. Between greenery and water points, calm reigns. Do not hesitate.
D Shuttle (5 months ago)
Delightful private gardens by the river. Good views. Magnificent trees.
Dany Hdl (5 months ago)
Very interesting garden to visit especially in these high temperatures that we are currently experiencing thanks to the Eure which flows along the edge of this garden but above all thanks to the shade provided by these huge trees, some of which are several hundred years old. The vegetable garden similar to a medieval garden with its medicinal plants, vegetables, flowers and fruit trees is very interesting to visit. On the other hand, unless I am mistaken, I did not see any mention of toilets, which can be annoying
Christopher Daly (7 months ago)
The gardens were nice, but the tour was over shadowed by the discovery of living conditions of one of gaurd dogs. This poor animal was living in a small fenced in cage that had no been cleaned in some time, forcing it to live in it's own waste.
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