Finlayson Church

Tampere, Finland

The church of Finlayson is an unique part of the industrial heritage in Tampere. The Finlayson metallurgy and cotton industry was the employer for thousands of people in the 19th century. The cotton mill was permitted to hire their own factory priest In 1846 and the red brick church was completed in 1879 near the gate of factory site.

The church was designed by the city architect F.L. Calonius and represents the British congregational church style. Organs were made by Hill & Son in London in 1850s and brought to the church by Finlayson owner Wilhelm von Nottbeck.

The parish of Finlayson consisted all cotton mill workers and their families. In the 19th century this was near half of all inhabitants in Tampere. In 1981 Oy Finlayson Ab donated church to the Parish of Tampere. Today it is a popular wedding church.

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Details

Founded: 1879
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aulis Vakkilainen (12 months ago)
On tosi puhutteleva paikka
kirsi lehtonen (2 years ago)
Ok
Kaija Lehikoinen (2 years ago)
Häät oli kesällä on kaunis kirkko hyvä nähtävyys
Kaisa Niinimäki (2 years ago)
Aina niin kaunis ja lämmintunnelmainen kirkko.
Salaattimieskannu (2 years ago)
Kaunis, yksi ehdottomasti lempi kirkoistani tampereella. Rakennus itsessään omaa paljon ihanaa kuvallista merkitystään. Tykkään erityisesti kuinka herran valo saapuu sisälle elämänkukka ikkunan lävitse näyttäen horuksen silmän katsojalleen. Luojan siunausta, sillä sitä täältä löytyy hyväksyvän ilmapiirinsä keskuudesta.
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