Notre Dame de Guibray Church

Falaise, France

The church of the suburb of Guibray, situated outside the walls of Falaise and to the south, occupies the primitive site of a pagan sanctuary, transformed into a chapel, in the Merovingian period, before 650.

In c. 1000, a new church was built, and re-worked between the end of the 11th century and the end of the 12th century, on a Romanesque plan with a central nave, two side aisles and a short transept, at the instigation of the abbey of the Trinité in Caen. The church is a dependency of the abbey of Caen like all the churches of Falaise through a donation in 1066 by the lord of Falaise, Mézidon and Ecajeul. The unity of the building was significantly disrupted by numerous re-workings, from the 13th century, but the façade from the 12th century has been preserved as well as the chevet from the end of the 11th century, with its three apses on several floors, very like those in Saint-Nicolas in Caen. The choir, stripped of its neo-classical decoration in 1986 has had its Romanesque arcatures restored to it. Some interesting Romanesque capitals top the pillars of the transept, choir and its side aisles.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.mondes-normands.caen.fr

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Blain Jérôme (6 months ago)
Belle église et sa ville
Jean-louis Leveel (10 months ago)
Very beautiful wind organ of any beauty
sandrine m (13 months ago)
Beautiful church
monique egret (14 months ago)
Yes, I like this church, it reminds me of memories of my childhood.
kevin mullois (3 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Seaplane Harbour Museum

The Seaplane Harbour is the newest and one of the most exciting museums in Tallinn. It tells stories about the Estonian maritime and military history. The museum’s display, that comprises of more than a couple of hundred large exhibits, revitalizes the colourful history of Estonia.

British built submarine Lembit weighing 600 tones is the centrepiece of the new museum. Built in 1936 for the Estonian navy, Lembit served in the World War II under the Soviet flag. It remained in service for 75 years being the oldest submarine in the World still in use until it was hauled ashore in 2011. Despite its long history, Lembit is still in an excellent condition offering a glimpse of the 1930s art of technology.

Another exciting attraction is a full-scale replica of Short Type 184, a British pre-World War II seaplane, which was also used by the Estonian armed forces. Short Type 184 has earned its place in military history by being the first aircraft ever to attack an enemy’s ship with an air-launched torpedo. Since none of the original seaplanes have survived, the replica in Seaplane Harbour is the only full-size representation of the aircraft in the whole World.

Simulators mimicking a flight above Tallinn, around-the-world journey in the yellow submarine, navigating on the Tallinn bay make this museum heaven for kids or adventurous adults.

Seaplane Harbour operates in architecturally unique hangars built almost a century ago, in 1916 and 1917, as a part of Peter the Great sea fortress. These hangars are the World’s first reinforced concrete shell structures of such a great size. Charles Lindbergh, the man who performed the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, landed here in 1930s.

On the outdoor area visitors can tour a collection of historic ships, including the Suur Tõll, Europe's largest steam-powered icebreaker.