Atlantic Wall Museum

Ouistreham, France

Located at a stones throw from the beach and the Ferry terminal, the Atlantic Wall Museum (Le Grand Bunker Musee du Mur de l'Atlantique) is inside the old German headquarter which was in charge of the batteries covering the entrance of the river Orne and the canal. The 52ft high concrete tower has been fully restaured to make it look how it was on the 6th of june 1944.

You will discover on the Grand Bunker's six floors all its inner rooms, which have been recreated down to the last detail: generator room, gas filters room, casemate with machine gun protecting the entrance, dormitory, medical store, sick bay, armoury, ammunition store, radio transmission room, telephone switchboard, observation post equipped with a powerful range-finder and on the top floor a 360° view over Sword Beach.

You will also be able to see many photographs and documents concerning the construction of the Atlantic wall, the artillery, the beach defences, observation, etc. A souvenir of the assault and shock troops specially trained for OVERLORD operation to attack the Atlantic Wall, and the everyday life of the Germany Army soldiers.

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Details

Founded: 1944
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Royco (11 months ago)
Very good well preserved piece of the WWII history. This was very impressive.....
Luc Baetens (14 months ago)
Interesting place. First time we saw a bunker this size and with such level of technical sophistication.
Ralph van Roosmalen (14 months ago)
It is not the best museum but when you are close, definitely worth a visit. It feels like the soldiers left. It feels authentic. It is not too expensive.
Miss Baguette (14 months ago)
The Bunker itself is impressive and has lots of memorabilia of the war. It will take you about 45 mins to see everything, it's not too big but it is worth visiting if you're in the area and interested in D-day.
Daniela Rank (2 years ago)
History at its best. Very interesting to Look around.
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