Château de Médavy

Médavy, France

Château de Médavy is a beautiful 18th century castle with classical architecture inspired in particular by Mansart (Versailles’ architect). Current main building was erected between 1705 and 1724 for Jacques-Léonor Rouxel de Médavy, marshal of France. The entirety was refurbished between 1754 and 1789 by Pierre Thiroux de Monregard, superintendent of the French relays and postal service.

The guided tour allows visitors to discover an elegant stairway, rooms decorated with pieces of French eighteenth century furniture, and portraits of previous owners such as the countess of Thiroux de Monregard painted by Louis-Michel Van Loo (Louis XVth court portraitist). Finally, two well-endowed chart rooms shelter Spanish cabinets as well as a collection of globes and atlases from the XVI to the XVIII century.

Outdoors (non-guided), two superb pathways, lined by lime trees, offer a pleasant walk along the Orne river. One of the towers has been transformed into a chapel and African works of art are exposed in the dovecote.

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Address

Le Château 3, Médavy, France
See all sites in Médavy

Details

Founded: 1705-1724
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Béatrice Marais (3 years ago)
Sébastien Durand (3 years ago)
Château très intéressant. Visites guidées vivement conseillées. À faire en famille (Lamas et Alpagas à caresser si vous avez de la chance).
Aline Mrchd (3 years ago)
Damien Bahier (3 years ago)
ALAIN GARDERES (3 years ago)
Très bien
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