Château de Lanniron

Quimper, France

Château de Lanniron belonged to the bishops of Quimper since the 12th century. In the 15th century, Lord Bertrand de Rosmadec erected a new manor which his successors used until the end of the 18th century either as a permanent residence or a summer residence. In the 17th century, Lord François de Coëtlogon extended the property. He will be remembered not only for his great deeds as a bishop but also for creating wonderful gardens.

The main embellishments of Lanniron were the large canal, the fountains, the ornamental Lake of Neptune and the Orangerie which is now the place for concerts during the musical weeks of Quimper. Also Lord Ploeuc and Lord Farcy beautified Lanniron and the manor was extended.

During the revolution, Lanniron sadly declined and it was subsequently sold by the State in 1791. It was looted, it had several owners for about 10 years and Emmanuel Harrington converted the manor to a Palladian residence. From plannings, that were drawn in London, we can deduce that Harrington wanted to modernise the gardens by removing the terraces. Fortunately, he did not have the necessary time to execute his project.

Charles de Kerret, the grandfather of the present owners, became the owner of Lanniron in 1833. He also brought back Sequoïas and Wellingtonias. Lanniron suffered a lot during the German occupation in the last war. Around 1950 one of the main features of the big canal, its water, was deprived. The camping site of Orangerie de Lanniron was created in 1969 in order to maintain the survival of the property and to attract tourists to the banks of the River Odet and its region.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.lanniron.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emz Lagundino (6 months ago)
Beautiful, and very relaxing Parc with a garden and a view of the chateau..really stunning..worth the visit..its very massive great place to stroll
Gijs Leffelaar (10 months ago)
9 euro entrance fee is a bit much to have a walk in a garden. Though the children did like the climbing and bouncing activities in the trampoforest.
Joe Feehan (2 years ago)
Good facilities for all forms of camping. Well laid out and serviced. Had a wonderful two weeks holiday. Aqua park pool is a great feature. Very close to Quimper and supermarkets. Nice walks around gardens and also to town centre.
Steve The Techy (2 years ago)
We camped here for a couple of nights. It suited us very well. A very large campsite, but very quiet and uncrowded. It was out of season. Lovely to listen to the birds at dawn. On the site there was plenty to see , and plenty of areas to walk to. Fortunately most of the amenities were closed. This was May. The swimming pool and the shops were closed. The golf course and the bar/restaurant were open. The is a nice walk into the town centre, you don't have to walk down any roads to get there.
Bob Payne (2 years ago)
Great for a motor- home stop for one or two nights... maybe more. Spacious pitches, water and hookups closeby. Restaurant and bar a bit of a walk but seemed popular. Loos and showers clean and modern. For a longer stay there is the 9 hole golf course and range and the aqua park. Expensive if you don't use all that is available but still worth a stop I think.
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