Crucuno dolmen is one of the most well known dolmens in the Brittany. The rectangular chamber is about 4 metres by 3.5 metres, covered by a single massive capstone which measures over 7 metres in length, perched on top of 9 support stones, with easily enough room to stand upright inside. The enormous capstone is 7.6 metres in length and weighs about 40 tons. Unfortunately, a century or so ago, a house was built right next to it, and this has destroyed all but the last pair of entrance passageway uprights and their capstone. This passageway was recorded in the last century as being 20-25 metres in length, leading away towards the southeast.

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Address

Crucuno, Plouharnel, France
See all sites in Plouharnel

More Information

www.megalithic.co.uk

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

oliver opie (14 months ago)
Very nice place to visit,very calming, beaches in the areas are outstanding.
Marco Brioni (16 months ago)
One of the best of the entire region
English Guy in France (RappinRich) (16 months ago)
Big dolmen just off main road near the houses
Charlie Roy (2 years ago)
Amazing and tremendous rock capstone about 2 meters off the ground. Weight is given as 30 to 40 tons (36,000 Kilograms). Just awe inspiring thinking about how people without modern machines could move and place stones like this. Plus no fences, you can walk up to it and go in.
Hans Lamme (3 years ago)
Indrukwekkend hunebed, onderdeel van een veelheid van historische locaties in de buurt. Alles prima te vinden op de fiets, maar soms lastig met de auto...
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