Crucuno dolmen is one of the most well known dolmens in the Brittany. The rectangular chamber is about 4 metres by 3.5 metres, covered by a single massive capstone which measures over 7 metres in length, perched on top of 9 support stones, with easily enough room to stand upright inside. The enormous capstone is 7.6 metres in length and weighs about 40 tons. Unfortunately, a century or so ago, a house was built right next to it, and this has destroyed all but the last pair of entrance passageway uprights and their capstone. This passageway was recorded in the last century as being 20-25 metres in length, leading away towards the southeast.

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Address

Crucuno, Plouharnel, France
See all sites in Plouharnel

More Information

www.megalithic.co.uk

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans Lamme (2 years ago)
Indrukwekkend hunebed, onderdeel van een veelheid van historische locaties in de buurt. Alles prima te vinden op de fiets, maar soms lastig met de auto...
Jana Holická (2 years ago)
Zachovalý velký dolmen s 11 vnitřními kameny na návsi malé vesničky Crucuno. Doporučuji pro ty, kdo mají rádi zachovalé megalitické stavby.
Martha López-Fonseca (2 years ago)
Interesting and intriguing. Nothing else around.
Mark Hagger (2 years ago)
A most impressive dolmen. You would struggle to fit the stones with modern machinery. How did they do it?
david barker (2 years ago)
Amazing structure well worth a short visit if in Carnac area
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