Originally built in the late 17th century for the Cheyne family, owners of the Tangwick estate, Tangwick Haa was converted into a local history museum in the late 1980s. The Laird’s Room is furnished as it would have been in the 19th century and is filled a variety of Victorian artefacts while the Reception Room displays agricultural tools and household objects from the period. There are also historical photographs and other exhibits relating to the area’s crafting and fishing industries on display. Upstairs, the main room is usually dedicated to an exhibition on a particular theme. The museum’s Family History section allows visitor to trace their genealogy by consulting parish and census records displayed on microfilm. Members of staff are also on hand to provide further assistance. Wi-Fi and tea and coffee making facilities are available.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

kevin coughlin (2 years ago)
This small museum is not to be missed. We found it on the way back from Eshaness lighthouse on Shetland Island, UK. It is full of pictures and artifacts from the area back in the heyday of the herring fishing boom. There are plenty of items donated by the locals from their grand parents. Lots of fishing photos and items used for fishing There are also clothes and a beautiful hand made silk wedding dress from the period. There was a picture on the wall of a Croft house down by the shore with 12 fishing boats pulled up on the shore unloading their catch. We drove to the end of the highway and that house is still standing on the shore. Yes the highway just ends and we climbed over the fence at the designated place and walked down to the shore...dodging the sheep poop. I'm not describing the museum very well but I was fascinated with everything inside. The woman that works there was so nice and friendly. I would recommend this to everyone that is within an hours ride to go there.
D & A (2 years ago)
Another of Shetland's fascinating volunteer- run local history museums and local info centres, in this case located in the historic Tangwick Haa on the road to Eshaness light house. Really friendly welcome from the members on duty and the collection we felt one of the nest of this genre on the islands. Lovely sheltered walled garden with picnic tables but no cafe. Breiwick just down tbe road if you need a cuppa.
Lynn Stonehouse (2 years ago)
Lovely local museum of Shetland life. Great collection, well described
Christine (3 years ago)
Excellent museum of Shetland history and the Cheyne family. Also census and other records available in this lovely, quiet and remote spot of Eshaness. Staffed by very friendly, helpful volunteers. Well worth a visit.
Bob McAndrew (3 years ago)
Go in if you are passing.. good resource for Shetland family history
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