Originally built in the late 17th century for the Cheyne family, owners of the Tangwick estate, Tangwick Haa was converted into a local history museum in the late 1980s. The Laird’s Room is furnished as it would have been in the 19th century and is filled a variety of Victorian artefacts while the Reception Room displays agricultural tools and household objects from the period. There are also historical photographs and other exhibits relating to the area’s crafting and fishing industries on display. Upstairs, the main room is usually dedicated to an exhibition on a particular theme. The museum’s Family History section allows visitor to trace their genealogy by consulting parish and census records displayed on microfilm. Members of staff are also on hand to provide further assistance. Wi-Fi and tea and coffee making facilities are available.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

kevin coughlin (2 years ago)
This small museum is not to be missed. We found it on the way back from Eshaness lighthouse on Shetland Island, UK. It is full of pictures and artifacts from the area back in the heyday of the herring fishing boom. There are plenty of items donated by the locals from their grand parents. Lots of fishing photos and items used for fishing There are also clothes and a beautiful hand made silk wedding dress from the period. There was a picture on the wall of a Croft house down by the shore with 12 fishing boats pulled up on the shore unloading their catch. We drove to the end of the highway and that house is still standing on the shore. Yes the highway just ends and we climbed over the fence at the designated place and walked down to the shore...dodging the sheep poop. I'm not describing the museum very well but I was fascinated with everything inside. The woman that works there was so nice and friendly. I would recommend this to everyone that is within an hours ride to go there.
D & A (2 years ago)
Another of Shetland's fascinating volunteer- run local history museums and local info centres, in this case located in the historic Tangwick Haa on the road to Eshaness light house. Really friendly welcome from the members on duty and the collection we felt one of the nest of this genre on the islands. Lovely sheltered walled garden with picnic tables but no cafe. Breiwick just down tbe road if you need a cuppa.
Lynn Stonehouse (2 years ago)
Lovely local museum of Shetland life. Great collection, well described
Christine (3 years ago)
Excellent museum of Shetland history and the Cheyne family. Also census and other records available in this lovely, quiet and remote spot of Eshaness. Staffed by very friendly, helpful volunteers. Well worth a visit.
Bob McAndrew (3 years ago)
Go in if you are passing.. good resource for Shetland family history
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Les Invalides

Les Invalides is a complex of buildings containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building"s original purpose. The buildings house the Musée de l"Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d"Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France"s war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte.

Louis XIV initiated the project in 1670, as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers: the name is a shortened form of hôpital des invalides. The architect of Les Invalides was Libéral Bruant. The enlarged project was completed in 1676, the river front measured 196 metres and the complex had fifteen courtyards. Jules Hardouin Mansart assisted the aged Bruant, and the chapel was finished in 1679 to Bruant"s designs after the elder architect"s death.

Shortly after the veterans" chapel was completed, Louis XIV commissioned Mansart to construct a separate private royal chapel referred to as the Église du Dôme from its most striking feature. Inspired by St. Peter"s Basilica in Rome, the original for all Baroque domes, it is one of the triumphs of French Baroque architecture. The domed chapel is centrally placed to dominate the court of honour. It was finished in 1708.

Because of its location and significance, the Invalides served as the scene for several key events in French history. On 14 July 1789 it was stormed by Parisian rioters who seized the cannons and muskets stored in its cellars to use against the Bastille later the same day. Napoleon was entombed under the dome of the Invalides with great ceremony in 1840. In December 1894 the degradation of Captain Alfred Dreyfus was held before the main building, while his subsequent rehabilitation ceremony took place in a courtyard of the complex in 1906.

The building retained its primary function of a retirement home and hospital for military veterans until the early twentieth century. In 1872 the musée d"artillerie (Artillery Museum) was located within the building to be joined by the Historical Museum of the Armies in 1896. The two institutions were merged to form the present musée de l"armée in 1905. At the same time the veterans in residence were dispersed to smaller centres outside Paris. The reason was that the adoption of a mainly conscript army, after 1872, meant a substantial reduction in the numbers of veterans having the twenty or more years of military service formerly required to enter the Hôpital des Invalides. The building accordingly became too large for its original purpose. The modern complex does however still include the facilities detailed below for about a hundred elderly or incapacitated former soldiers.