Tingwall Church dates back to the 12th century, though not in its present form. Originally it was St Magnus Church, one of three steeple churches in Shetland. This building survived five to six hundred years, and part of this building may be seen in the burial crypt adjacent to the church. In charge of the Church, and indeed of all Christianity in Shetland, was the Archdeacon of Tingwall, an office that dates from 1215 AD, and lasted until the final establishment of Presbyterianism in Scotland in 1690 AD. The present building was opened for worship in November 1790, making it the second oldest church building currently in regular use in Shetland (the oldest being at Lunna).

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Founded: 1790
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mary Wilkie (2 years ago)
Beautiful small church, very welcoming
Mary Wilkie (2 years ago)
Beautiful small church, very welcoming
Bartosz T Chalas (2 years ago)
The only one catholic church on Shetland. However, masses are provided in different parts of Shetland using buildings belong to other faiths ' Church of Scotland, Methodist etc... if needed.
Bartosz T Chalas (2 years ago)
The only one catholic church on Shetland. However, masses are provided in different parts of Shetland using buildings belong to other faiths ' Church of Scotland, Methodist etc... if needed.
Larry Deyell (3 years ago)
Bar seems over priced but the surroundings justify the extra expense.
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