Manoir du Plessis-Madeuc

Corseul, France

The Manor House of Plessix-Madeuc was built in the 16th century and underwent significant changes up until the 17th century. The building has excellent proportions and the tower, which dominates the southwest side, was traditionally the main living quarters of the lord of the Manor. The main door of the mansion is crowned by a triangular pediment decorated with the arms of the family of the Gaudemont Monforière, owners during the eighteenth century. Originally it belonged to the Madeuc family, one of the oldest names in the region meaning 'benevolent' in Breton. In the courtyard is an original double-sided well decorated with a superb carving.

Berenice and Olivier Dupuy have restored this property with the purpose of accommodating painters and photographers in residence and to open the charming apartments to holiday goers. The large garden with its beautiful rose garden and secluded position allows you to relax in serenity while enjoying the surrounding countryside.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sanzô (4 years ago)
Sympa
JL Gaffez (4 years ago)
Le charme des vieilles pierres, un accueil chaleureux et très agréable. Appartement très spacieux, bien aménagé. Idéal pour un séjour romantique, ou pittoresque en famille. Un petit déjeuner en salle copieux et frais. Une adresse à conserver !
Olivier MOREAU (5 years ago)
Lieu d'exeption, nous avons aprécié la discretion, la gentillesse,la bonne humeur de nos hotes, petit déjeuner de qualité ,literie réparatrice apréciée apres de longue balades dans cet espace magnifique. Le seul regret,sejour trop court
Moreau Nelly (5 years ago)
Agréable séjour au manoir ,nous sommes 2 couples de motards ,nous avons séjournés dans la suite familiale ,spatieuse, decore avec goût ,propreté exemplaire,très bonne literie. Propriétaires très agréable, Mr à beaucoup d' humour
Stephane Jolivet (5 years ago)
Tout est parfait le lieu l'accueil le cadre la région. Exceptionnel A faire absolument
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.