Manoir du Plessis-Madeuc

Corseul, France

The Manor House of Plessix-Madeuc was built in the 16th century and underwent significant changes up until the 17th century. The building has excellent proportions and the tower, which dominates the southwest side, was traditionally the main living quarters of the lord of the Manor. The main door of the mansion is crowned by a triangular pediment decorated with the arms of the family of the Gaudemont Monforière, owners during the eighteenth century. Originally it belonged to the Madeuc family, one of the oldest names in the region meaning 'benevolent' in Breton. In the courtyard is an original double-sided well decorated with a superb carving.

Berenice and Olivier Dupuy have restored this property with the purpose of accommodating painters and photographers in residence and to open the charming apartments to holiday goers. The large garden with its beautiful rose garden and secluded position allows you to relax in serenity while enjoying the surrounding countryside.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sanzô (3 years ago)
Sympa
JL Gaffez (3 years ago)
Le charme des vieilles pierres, un accueil chaleureux et très agréable. Appartement très spacieux, bien aménagé. Idéal pour un séjour romantique, ou pittoresque en famille. Un petit déjeuner en salle copieux et frais. Une adresse à conserver !
Olivier MOREAU (4 years ago)
Lieu d'exeption, nous avons aprécié la discretion, la gentillesse,la bonne humeur de nos hotes, petit déjeuner de qualité ,literie réparatrice apréciée apres de longue balades dans cet espace magnifique. Le seul regret,sejour trop court
Moreau Nelly (4 years ago)
Agréable séjour au manoir ,nous sommes 2 couples de motards ,nous avons séjournés dans la suite familiale ,spatieuse, decore avec goût ,propreté exemplaire,très bonne literie. Propriétaires très agréable, Mr à beaucoup d' humour
Stephane Jolivet (4 years ago)
Tout est parfait le lieu l'accueil le cadre la région. Exceptionnel A faire absolument
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