Poskaer Stenhus

Knebel, Denmark

Poskær Stenhus is Denmark's largest round barrow, dating from the age of Funnelbeaker culture (around 3300 BC). The best view of this monument is from the north approach by the road through the hills of Mols Bjerge. The burial chamber has a diameter of more than 2 metres and a ceiling height of almost 1.8 metres. The chamber is surrounded by 23 kerb stones, some of which are more than 2.5 metres high. In 1859, the owner, Ole Hansen, started blasting the barrow stones to sell them as building material. He needed the money for his family and couldn't turn a proper living from the land where the barrow was. The barrow was rescued by local officials.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 3300 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Denmark
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Denmark)

More Information

www.kulturarv.dk

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Bendixen (2 months ago)
A view back in time. Stone age grave monument. Worth a visit as location is beautiful.
Sven Garbade (15 months ago)
Very nice place
Stefano Sella (15 months ago)
Very special place full of energy!
Adi Kurniawan (19 months ago)
An ancient monument in a beautiful surrounding. Read about how this stone formation was saved from an attempt to destroy it to use the stones for building purposes. Worth a quick visit if you are in the area. The place is not difficult to reach. There is a car park and a toilet by the car park. The only downside is that there doesn't seem to be a rubbish bin in the area.
Mikkel Yde Kjær (2 years ago)
Imponerende konstruktion og rigtigt sjovt at kravle op på de mange sten.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.