Lunner Church

Lunner, Norway

Lunner church dates from the 12th century. It was originally only a stone church with a circular stone tower at the west side. On the image the original stone church can be seen on the right hand side.

Sometime between 1780 – 1790, the tower was dismantled and the church rebuilt into a cruciform church. This can be observed to the left in the picture.

The newer parts in wood underwent restoration work in 1987 – 1988. An archaeological excavation was carried out and the circular base of the old tower was recorded and left open for public display. Lunner church is the only known circular church tower in Norway. Over the circular base of the tower a new floor of glass was made so visitors of the church now can see this remarkable construction.

At the outside the medieval part of the church has nine stone reliefs. These ornaments depict humans and animals, probably battling for human souls. The ornaments are located on the southern and eastbound walls, and on the sacristy.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nils Arne Aaslund (4 months ago)
Great place where I look home
Thor Engedal (8 months ago)
Great church with fun old stone figures recessed into the brick walls. Blue. a character where it looks like Munch has taken inspiration for Scream;)
Jørn Victor Lindberg (9 months ago)
Flott og velstelt kirke. Er noe man bor se både for turister og lokale.
Sindre lb (2 years ago)
Large burial ground
Arve Aaseth (3 years ago)
It's a nice church.
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