Bakke Church

Trondheim, Norway

The octagonal wooden Bakke Church was built in 1715 and designed by the architect Johan Christopher Hempel. It is the oldest building in the Bakklandet area of Trondheim since it was the only building that was spared during the Swedish siege of 1718. After World War I, the Innherredsveien road (the old European route E6 highway) was widened and upgraded and the church was located too close to and the church became a major traffic obstruction. This led to plans to demolish the church, especially after the opening of the new Bakke bridge in 1927. It was decided to save the church, so the whole church was jacked up with a jack and moved several feet to the side in 1939. Then it was restored and consecrated again in 1941.

Although it is part of the established (Lutheran) Church of Norway, Bakke Church is also home to Trondheim's small Eastern Orthodox Church congregation, who do not possess their own church building.

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Founded: 1715
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carmen Grohs-Lugschitz (2 years ago)
It was the first time I entered this church thanks to a choir concert. An interesting style, simple and at the same time radiated calmness and security there.
Tove Lervik Jensen (3 years ago)
Nice and safe christening, in corona time.
Kenneth (3 years ago)
Great church. The church was built almost at the same time as the Hospital Church in the 18th century and is completely similar, only in a larger version.
Glenn Bakke (4 years ago)
Being a Bakke from Florida it is nice seeing more about our ancestors.
miki grkovic (5 years ago)
Nice church. Attended an orthodox liturgy in it. It was beautiful.
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