Archbishop's Palace

Trondheim, Norway

The Archbishop's Palace is a castle and palace in the city of Trondheim, located just south of the Nidaros Cathedral. For hundreds of years, the castle was the seat, residence and administrative center of the Archbishop of Nidaros.

The castle is one of the largest medieval stone structures in Scandinavia and the oldest walls are likely from the 13th century. The Archbishops of Nidaros expanded the castle gradually, with great halls and residential areas being built over time. Norway’s last Archbishop, Olav Engelbrektsson, attempted to make a final stand and defend the castle during the Reformation but eventually fled into exile.

After the abolishment of Roman Catholicism, the castle became royal property where the local lensherre resided. The castle was restored, rebuilt into a residential palace and eventually used more for military purposes, again being expanded considerably. After the Sovereignty Act of 1660, the castle became the seat and residence of the Amtmann.

Museums

Today, the castle has several museums, is frequently used by the Church of Norway and is also the venue of Olavsfestdagene. The Regalia of Norway have been kept in the western flank of the castle at various times since 1826, but have been on permanent display in the castle since 2006.

'The Armoury' (Rustkammeret) is a Norwegian army museum as well as a resistance museum, emphasizing the military history of Trøndelag. Military equipment of Norway during World War II at display in the 'Armoury' Army Museum in Trondheim. The museum has weapons, uniforms and other artifacts on display, starting with the Viking Age, going through the Middle Ages and the Norwegian union with Denmark (1380–1814) and later with Sweden (1814–1905), up to the German occupation of Norway during World War II (1940–1945).

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Malin Felicia Kvalvik (10 months ago)
Good to take pictures here, really mystical feel?
Farlon Souto (13 months ago)
It's always a peaceful travel towards some hundred years in the past.
Pål Th Ekeheien (3 years ago)
Great museum with great pieces. Dot's the i for a visit to Nidaros.
Pål Th Ekeheien (3 years ago)
Great museum with great pieces. Dot's the i for a visit to Nidaros.
Mardiray (4 years ago)
This is an open-air museum adjacent to Nidaros Cathedral. The medieval stone walls on display stand in stark contrast to the highly decorated church next door. It is an ideal place to bring the children when they want to play knights and castles. Some paths are gravel or cobblestone and might be hard to navigate by wheelchair. There are also some sills at some of the doorways.
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