Our Lady's Church

Trondheim, Norway

Our Lady's Church (Vår Frue kirke) was erected around the year 1200. The victim of many fires, it was restored in 1739, but parts of the thick, solid walls of the Church are obviously much older. The first tower of the church was built around 1640, but the current tower was built in 1742 and the spire was erected in 1779. However, the eastern part of church (to the right in the picture) is identical to the 'Church of Our Mary' from the end of the 12th century.

The Baroque style altar dates from 1744 and rococo pulpit from 1771. There are also chandeliers from the 17th and 18th centuries. On the church wall you can see Runes which were carved into the stone 800 years ago.

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Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Geert Loer (11 months ago)
Impressive old cathedral in a really cozy street.
paulo duarte (14 months ago)
Our favourite Trondheim church. Much smaller but with a more welcoming feeling if you will. The organ was very beautiful and expertly crafted. Peaceful.
Kári Hansen (2 years ago)
Just another church...
Keivan Sayyar (2 years ago)
Nice place to with a good sound reverb for singing.
Ole Grytbakk (3 years ago)
Hooly
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