The Holy, Royal and Stavropegic Monastery of Kykkos is one of the wealthiest and best-known monasteries in Cyprus.It was founded around the end of the 11th century by the Byzantine emperor Alexios I Komnenos (1081 - 1118). The monastery lies at an altitude of 1318 meters on the north west face of Troödos Mountains. There are no remains of the original monastery as it was burned down many times.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 1090
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steve Smith (2 years ago)
A must see for any visitor to Cyprus. The road up the Troodos is spectacular but the beacon at the end is the Kykkos monastery. I'm not going to say anymore find out for yourself
fadi hrimat (2 years ago)
Amazing place, great for prayer, tranquility, spend time with oneself, enjoy the nature and the surrounding, the museum is very nice and rich, we spent more than 2 hours there and enjoyed every minute of our time
Caroline Downing (2 years ago)
Beautiful, went for day trip with guide. Very knowledgeable. Stopped at Troodos for a meal in this old wooden building, the food and people were brilliant, really enjoyed the cultural side of this trip.
Tomas Mousoulides (3 years ago)
A nice tour through the mountains takes you to the middle of the island. Kykkos monastery is a magical place
Carlos Gomes (3 years ago)
A nice hidden gem on the mountains of Cyprus. Definitely worth checking it out. The sunset there is beautiful. The road through the mountains unfortunately is not the best.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.