Trooditissa Monastery

Troodos, Cyprus

The exact date of the foundation of Trooditissa Monastery, situated on the southern slopes of the Troodos Mountains, is not known. But according to local tradition, the monastery was established immediately after the iconoclastic era (around 990 AD). As with other monasteries, it was preceded by a hermit who resorted there during the years of the iconoclasm.

Nothing remains of the monastery of the Middle Byzantine period or the period of Frankish rule. The oldest reference to the Monastery of Trooditissa is found in a copy of a 14th century deed. The church, as well as the monastic buildings, belong to a later period and can be dated to the end of the 18th or the 19th and 20th centuries (the main building was completed in 1731). The heirlooms saved in the church of the monastery also belong to these later periods. The present church, dating to 1731, contains valuable icons including a precious icon of Panagia covered with silver-gilt from Asia Minor.

Monk Damaskinos (1939 - 1942) and his success or Abbot Pangkratios, revived the monastery after it came close to being dissolved in the 19th century. A large religious fair is held every year on the grounds of the monastery on August 15th, day of the Dormition of Panagia. Prayers to the holy icon of Panagia give hope to childless couples wishing to have children.

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Address

E804, Troodos, Cyprus
See all sites in Troodos

Details

Founded: c. 990 AD
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Socrates Nicolaou (4 months ago)
A peaceful destination inside the troodos Forest
Angela Petridou (4 months ago)
Couldn't visit the main church
Vasilios Moschos (10 months ago)
One of the oldest monasteries in Cyprus. No tourists are allowed.
K. Dip (13 months ago)
This is a lovely Holly place to be. Simple and amazing monastery. Great big bookshop.
Stanciu Eugen (15 months ago)
Quite place. However,closed for the visits of the tourists.
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