Trooditissa Monastery

Troodos, Cyprus

The exact date of the foundation of Trooditissa Monastery, situated on the southern slopes of the Troodos Mountains, is not known. But according to local tradition, the monastery was established immediately after the iconoclastic era (around 990 AD). As with other monasteries, it was preceded by a hermit who resorted there during the years of the iconoclasm.

Nothing remains of the monastery of the Middle Byzantine period or the period of Frankish rule. The oldest reference to the Monastery of Trooditissa is found in a copy of a 14th century deed. The church, as well as the monastic buildings, belong to a later period and can be dated to the end of the 18th or the 19th and 20th centuries (the main building was completed in 1731). The heirlooms saved in the church of the monastery also belong to these later periods. The present church, dating to 1731, contains valuable icons including a precious icon of Panagia covered with silver-gilt from Asia Minor.

Monk Damaskinos (1939 - 1942) and his success or Abbot Pangkratios, revived the monastery after it came close to being dissolved in the 19th century. A large religious fair is held every year on the grounds of the monastery on August 15th, day of the Dormition of Panagia. Prayers to the holy icon of Panagia give hope to childless couples wishing to have children.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

E804, Troodos, Cyprus
See all sites in Troodos

Details

Founded: c. 990 AD
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerry McPartland (4 days ago)
This monastery is set in a lovely troudos village breath takeing views beautiful church only open weekend bur small one beside it open every day 0ut of 10/9
Aija Rimsa (13 days ago)
Very peaceful place.
Nina Maxim (2 months ago)
Closed for tourists, the monastery only welcomes pilgrims
Mel Michael (2 months ago)
A monastery full of history, prayer, dozens of relics and countless miracles. A must-see for all people.
panicos kyriacou (5 months ago)
One of the greatest monastery's in cyprus. The surrounding nature is very beautiful.Inside the monastery is a unique holy place where your mind and your soul must cleared up from any other thoughts and dedicate time for humiliation, praying and communicate with GOD!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen is located in the Isle of Man"s historic capital, Castletown. The castle is amongst the best examples of medieval castles in the British Isles, and is still in use as a court house, museum and educational centre.

The exact date of castle is unknown, although construction is thought to have taken place during the reigns of the late 12th century and early 13th century rulers of the Isle of Man – the Kings of Mann and the Isles. The original Castle Rushen consisted of a central square stone tower, or keep. The site was also fortified to guard the entrance to the Silver Burn. From its early beginnings, the castle was continually developed by successive rulers of Mann between the 13th and 16th century. The limestone walls dominated much of the surrounding landscape, serving as a point of dominance for the various rulers of the Isle of Man. By 1313, the original keep had been reinforced with towers to the west and south. In the 14th century, an east tower, gatehouses, and curtain wall were added.

After several more changes of hands the English and their supporters eventually prevailed. The English king Edward I Longshanks claimed that the island had belonged to the Kings of England for generations and he was merely reasserting their rightful claim to the Isle of Man.

The 18th century saw the castle in steady decay. By the end of the century it was converted into a prison. Even though the castle was in continuous use as a prison, the decline continued until the turn of the 20th century, when it was restored under the oversight of the Lieutenant Governor, George Somerset, 3rd Baron Raglan. Following the restoration work, and the completion of the purpose-built Victoria Road Prison in 1891, the castle was transferred from the British Crown to the Isle of Man Government in 1929.

Today it is run as a museum by Manx National Heritage, depicting the history of the Kings and Lords of Mann. Most rooms are open to the public during the opening season (March to October), and all open rooms have signs telling their stories. The exhibitions include a working medieval kitchen where authentic period food is prepared on special occasions and re-enactments of various aspects of medieval life are held on a regular basis, with particular emphasis on educating the local children about their history. Archaeological finds made during excavations in the 1980s are displayed and used as learning tools for visitors.