Saint-Gildas de Rhuys Abbey

Saint-Gildas-de-Rhuys, France

The Abbey of Saint-Gildas is dedicated to St. Gildas (c. 500–570) who was a British historian and cleric. He is one of the best-documented figures of the Christian church in the British Isles during this period. According a legend Gildas established the abbey, but there are no written evidences. Buildings were destroyed by Norman raids in the 10th century.

The first known record dates from 1008 when the abbey was restored by the order of Geoffrey I of Bretagne. The new inauguration was held in 1032. The heyday of Saint-Gildas Abbey was in the 11th-14th centuries. During the Hundred Years' War most of the archives were destroyed. The monastery started to decay in the 16th century. The nave of the church collapsed in 1668 when a lightning hit it.

the next restoration took place in the late 1600s. The abbey church was moved as a parish church during the Great Revolution in 1796.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.abbaye-de-rhuys.fr

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Nordberg (2 years ago)
An interesting church, worth the visit if passing through the town
Asle Sletten (5 years ago)
Beautyful small french town.
Muzza Grant (5 years ago)
Amazing
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