Château de Boutavent Ruins

Iffendic, France

Château de Boutavent may have been built in the 11th century, but there is no written evidence of exact date. It has been confirmed that during the 13th and 14th century, the castle belonged to the Lords of Montfort. According a legend during the 7th century the castle was the residence of Judicaël, King of Domnonée, and that it had been the place where the King and saint Éloi met. This last was sent to bring peace in a fight for borders between Bretons and French.

The castle is structured into two classical elements: a courtyard and a barnyard, separated by a deep gap. Four buildings which could be guesthouses, are on both sides of the barnyard. The fortification and elements of the barnyard can still be seen.

In the 16th century, the castle was already ruined. The circumstances of the destruction of the fortified site of Boutavent remain mysterious. Maybe it has been dismantled during the War of succession (second half of the 14th century) or in 1373, during the campaign of Bertrand du Guesclin in Brittany, but nothing proves that the castle hasn't been inhabited then.

Many local authors of the 19th century wrote about Boutavent, in particular writers like Poignand, Vigoland or Oresve. Even though these stories constitute rare stories about the site, it is impossible to retrace the entire history of the castle, as there are only a few sources.

The castle has not been searched yet but many campaigns of consolidation of the relics took place since 2006. During these campaigns, archaeological material has been found (slate, ceramic, ground pavement and glazed tiles).

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Address

Boutavent, Iffendic, France
See all sites in Iffendic

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Etienne Roux (15 months ago)
L'application GtPO est un plus pour faire la visite avec les enfants mais elle n'est pas très bien pensée... Cela dit, ça rend la visite ludique et le site est sympa.
Herve Frances (16 months ago)
Sur 1 des parcours de la chambre aux loups on passe par le domaine de Boutavent site médiéval à découvrir ou beaucoup de panneaux explique ce qu était ce lieu et les travaux qui sont en cours. Intéressant
Emmanuelle Hemery (16 months ago)
Ce site est assez fascinant, riche d'histoire. Il intrigue notre imaginaire... Pour les amateurs de randonnée en famille. Il est le lieu de départ idéal d'un beau circuit vers la chambre au loup et même le lac de Trémelin. J'ai découvert ce site grâce au geocoaching et les enfants, qui n'avaient pas trop envie de marcher ce jour-là, ont adoré
Erica Haller (2 years ago)
Nice walking area
Co Gautier (2 years ago)
Un lac dans les bois aux alentours aménagés. Tour 5 km très accessible. Nombreuses activités. Bar restaurant sur place. Pique nique possible. De quoi passer une magnifique journée!
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