Château de Boutavent Ruins

Iffendic, France

Château de Boutavent may have been built in the 11th century, but there is no written evidence of exact date. It has been confirmed that during the 13th and 14th century, the castle belonged to the Lords of Montfort. According a legend during the 7th century the castle was the residence of Judicaël, King of Domnonée, and that it had been the place where the King and saint Éloi met. This last was sent to bring peace in a fight for borders between Bretons and French.

The castle is structured into two classical elements: a courtyard and a barnyard, separated by a deep gap. Four buildings which could be guesthouses, are on both sides of the barnyard. The fortification and elements of the barnyard can still be seen.

In the 16th century, the castle was already ruined. The circumstances of the destruction of the fortified site of Boutavent remain mysterious. Maybe it has been dismantled during the War of succession (second half of the 14th century) or in 1373, during the campaign of Bertrand du Guesclin in Brittany, but nothing proves that the castle hasn't been inhabited then.

Many local authors of the 19th century wrote about Boutavent, in particular writers like Poignand, Vigoland or Oresve. Even though these stories constitute rare stories about the site, it is impossible to retrace the entire history of the castle, as there are only a few sources.

The castle has not been searched yet but many campaigns of consolidation of the relics took place since 2006. During these campaigns, archaeological material has been found (slate, ceramic, ground pavement and glazed tiles).

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Boutavent, Iffendic, France
See all sites in Iffendic

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Etienne Roux (2 years ago)
L'application GtPO est un plus pour faire la visite avec les enfants mais elle n'est pas très bien pensée... Cela dit, ça rend la visite ludique et le site est sympa.
Herve Frances (2 years ago)
Sur 1 des parcours de la chambre aux loups on passe par le domaine de Boutavent site médiéval à découvrir ou beaucoup de panneaux explique ce qu était ce lieu et les travaux qui sont en cours. Intéressant
Emmanuelle Hemery (2 years ago)
Ce site est assez fascinant, riche d'histoire. Il intrigue notre imaginaire... Pour les amateurs de randonnée en famille. Il est le lieu de départ idéal d'un beau circuit vers la chambre au loup et même le lac de Trémelin. J'ai découvert ce site grâce au geocoaching et les enfants, qui n'avaient pas trop envie de marcher ce jour-là, ont adoré
Erica Haller (3 years ago)
Nice walking area
Co Gautier (3 years ago)
Un lac dans les bois aux alentours aménagés. Tour 5 km très accessible. Nombreuses activités. Bar restaurant sur place. Pique nique possible. De quoi passer une magnifique journée!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lednice Castle

The first historical record of Lednice locality dates from 1222. At that time there stood a Gothic fort with courtyard, which was lent by Czech King Václav I to Austrian nobleman Sigfried Sirotek in 1249.

At the end of the 13th century the Liechtensteins, originally from Styria, became holders of all of Lednice and of nearby Mikulov. They gradually acquired land on both sides of the Moravian-Austrian border. Members of the family most often found fame in military service, during the Renaissance they expanded their estates through economic activity. From the middle of the 15th century members of the family occupied the highest offices in the land. However, the family’s position in Moravia really changed under the brothers Karel, Maximilian, and Gundakar of Liechtenstein. Through marriage Karel and Maximilian acquired the great wealth of the old Moravian dynasty of the Černohorskýs of Boskovice. At that time the brothers, like their father and grandfather, were Lutheran, but they soon converted to Catholicism, thus preparing the ground for their rise in politics. Particularly Karel, who served at the court of Emperor Rudolf II, became hetman of Moravia in 1608, and was later raised to princely status by King Matyas II and awarded the Duchy of Opava.

During the revolt of the Czech nobility he stood on the side of the Habsburgs, and took part in the Battle of White Mountain. After the uprising was defeated in 1620 he systematically acquired property confiscated from some of the rebels, and the Liechtensteins became the wealthiest family in Moravia, rising in status above the Žerotíns. Their enormous land holdings brought them great profits, and eventually allowed them to carry out their grandious building projects here in Lednice.

In the 16th century it was probably Hartmann II of Liechtenstein who had the old medieval water castle torn down and replaced with a Renaissance chateau. At the end of the 17th century the chateau was torn down and a Baroque palace was built, with an extensive formal garden, and a massive riding hall designed by Johann Bernard Fischer von Erlach that still stands in almost unaltered form.

In the mid-18th century the chateau was again renovated, and in 1815 its front tracts that had been part of the Baroque chateau were removed.

The chateau as it looks today dates from 1846-1858, when Prince Alois II decided that Vienna was not suitable for entertaining in the summer, and had Lednice rebuilt into a summer palace in the spirit of English Gothic. The hall on the ground floor would serve to entertain the European aristocracy at sumptuous banquets, and was furnished with carved wood ceilings, wooden panelling, and select furniture, surpassing anything of its kind in Europe.